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Posts tagged with 'zoology'

From pyramids to underwater exploration

29 April 2010 by Kay C

Have you been catching the latest tweets?

Our Public Lecture Series on Thursday afternoons at World Museum got off to a flying start last week. It continues today, with two great topics: at 2pm – The Recovery of a Fragment of an Egyptian Pyramid; and 2.30pm – Raywatch: Angling for Data. The talks will take place in the Treasure House Theatre and admission is free. See you later!

Save The Frogs!

23 April 2010 by Lisa

Have we ever had a ‘frog blog’ story on our blog before? I don’t think we have! To continue our series of blogs celebrating the World Museum’s 150th anniversary, we’ve got some news from our resident frog fanatic and Aquarist, Phil Lewis. Read on to find out what he’s currently working on at the museum…


Save the Frogs is an international team of scientists, educators, policymakers and naturalists dedicated to protecting the worlds amphibian species: the frogs, toads, newts, salamanders and ceacilians.  It is the first and only public charity dedicated exclusively to amphibian conservation. Read more…

Something for Thursdays

21 April 2010 by Kay C

Thursday afternoons are never going to be the same again…

I am really excited about our new Spring 2010 Public Lecture Series, which kicks off tomorrow (April 22). It’s being held at the Treasure House Theatre, World Museum, and features a selection of subjects from our museums and galleries’ collections and exhibitions, from archaeology to contemporary slavery.

For the next four Thursdays, our curators will be talking about some of the fascinating things they have researched. Read more…

Live video link up

30 March 2010 by Lisa

Here is Curator of Vertebrate Zoology, Clem Fisher, to tell us about the World Museum’s latest live video link up with down under…


I presented a talk at the Museum & Art Gallery Northern Territory, Australia recently and still got home to Liverpool in time for tea! New Media Manager, Phil Phillips, had set up a video link for me as part of the Australian launch of my 360 page monograph on vertebrate zoology specimens collected at Port Essington, Cobourg Peninsula, on the north coast of Australia. The monograph is based on manuscripts written by the English collector John Gilbert. He visited Port Essington from 1840-1841 and collected hundreds of specimens there, many which were new to science. A good number of these are now in World Museum, along with specimens collected at Port Essington by the 13th Earl of Derby’s collector, John MacGillivray.
 
Port Essington, founded in 1838, was the first base of the British Navy in north Australia, from where the British were able to annex the whole continent. It was nearer Singapore than Sydney. The site is also important from the natural history point of view, as more than 8% of all forms of Australian birds and mammals were first collected there. Read more…