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Caldies Big Dig

7 April 2015 by Liz

Calderstones Mansion House

Calderstones Mansion House

The Museum of Liverpool’s archaeologists are busy preparing for our next dig, and this one’s a ‘big dig’ at Calderstones Park!

We’re working with The Reader Organisation to run a community dig, giving local people the chance to try their hand at archaeology and help investigate the long history of Calderstones Park.

We’ve already done some geophysics, a magnetometer survey, with the help of some hardy volunteers willing to stand up to the winter cold of Caldies! We tested out two potential areas for excavation, and we might have found some interesting anomalies right outside the mansion house – only digging will help us fully understand what they are.

We’re looking to investigate several different areas of the park, especially aiming to understand the ways in which the landscape was altered when the Calderstones Mansion House and the lost Harthill Mansion were built in the early 19th century. We might be able to reveal garden features and envisage what the park was like in that phase of its past.

Calderstones has a long history, and the ‘Calderstones’ are among the most important archaeological remains in Liverpool . They would have formed part of a Neolithic chambered tomb, who knows if we might reveal more about their era, around 3000BC.

To find out more about the Connect at Calderstones project and our other community archaeology work visit our project pages on the website. If you’d like to volunteer for this project contact richardmacdonald@the reader.org.uk

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