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Museum of Liverpool celebrates Year of the Pig

28 January 2019 by Claire

Folded lucky money envelopes made by volunteers as part of the Pigsy Challenge project

A Lucky Pigsy sculpture celebrating Chinese new year is to go on display at the Museum of Liverpool from 1 February.

During Chinese New Year celebrations, which mark the beginning of the new lunar year, Liverpool’s Chinatown really comes to life. 2019 is the Year of the Pig, the 12th animal of the Chinese zodiac. In ancient folklore, it is believed that the pig is 12th zodiac sign because he was the last animal to cross the river in the Jade Emperor’s Great Race.Growing up in Liverpool, I have vivid memories of going to Chinatown to see the beautiful red lanterns, lion dancing, fireworks and of course, enjoying the wonderful food.

Liverpool is home to the oldest established Chinese community in Europe. The trade links between China and Britain through the ports of Liverpool and Shanghai were instrumental in establishing a Chinese population in the city. It is also home to the largest Chinese Arch outside of China. Guarded by two striking bronze lions, the 44 feet tall landmark is the gateway to the city’s Chinatown district.
The arch is the central landmark for Chinese New Year festivities and this year, Museum of Liverpool will be displaying a large sculpture as part of the Year of the Pig celebrations.

Pagoda Arts Director, Zi Lan Liao

Over the past year, local Chinese cultural arts organisation, Pagoda Arts set a challenge to create a giant Pigsy sculpture using lucky money envelopes and the art of paper folding, Origami. Lucky money envelopes represent good luck for the year ahead and are a traditional gift given during Chinese New Year. Lots of volunteers and organisations between Liverpool and Hong have collected and folded 120,000 recycled paper envelopes into beautiful lantern and animal shapes.  ‘Artists, Barbara Disney and Rebecca Lines, have used the folded envelopes to create Pigsy, a character from the 16th century Chinese novel Journey to the West, one of the four classical novels of Chinese literature.’

Join us on 2 February and make your own folded paper artwork in a fantastic Origami workshop with Pagoda Arts.

 

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