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Posts tagged with 'social history'

Celebrating Angus Wood

11 October 2018 by Kay

group photo of men in suits

Angus Wood (with coat over his arms)

This Black History Month we celebrate diverse voices from Liverpool’s Black community. This second blog in the series celebrates the life of Angus Wood and his contribution to the war effort during the Second World War.

“Because I am from Jamaica, an engineer didn’t think I was capable of sharpening a drill, although after that you know we got on smashing. I was treated quite well, especially when they suddenly realised that everything in Kingston was the same as in England”

Angus Wood, speaking in 2002. Liverpool Voices, Liverpool Lives archive, Museum of Liverpool.

Angus was born in Kingston, Jamaica and came to Liverpool when he responded to the call for engineers to come and work in munitions factories here in Britain.  He left Kingston on 13 January 1940 with a large group of other skilled men.

After a long journey they docked in Scotland and travelled by train to Liverpool. Initially they lived at the YMCA in Birkenhead.

Angus was employed at ROF Fazakerley, a newly opened rifle manufacturing factory. Initially he was treated a little differently but once he proved that he knew his job he was treated the same as the other workers. His job, a protected occupation, was to set up machines that the women workers used to cut and grind components for rifles.

Angus also joined the factory’s own Home Guard, performing night fire watches and guard duty before and after a full days work.

The women workers in the factory helped them to find lodgings with local families. Angus lived for two years with the Roberts family, in Crescent Road, Fazakerley, before meeting his wife at the factory and setting up their own home.

Angus and his friends often went to the Grafton Ballroom in their free time. Here they experienced some racism from American GIs. Angus tells us more –

“The Americans didn’t want any coloured chaps in there, and we were British so they couldn’t stop us, and when they objected there was a fight.  I always keep clear of any fights. I was never personally involved in any of them”.

After the war the men were offered the opportunity to return to Jamaica, or stay in Britain. Angus, who was by then married with young children, chose to stay. He lived and worked in Liverpool, staying on at the factory until it closed in 1962.

Don’t forget to download our trail exploring how Liverpool’s Black community is represented in our displays and check out the Black History Month events across National Museums Liverpool’s venues throughout October.

Standing and walking proud

3 October 2018 by Kay

Addae wearing his rugby shirt

Addae, 2017. Courtesy of Liverpool Tritons RUFC

This Black History Month we celebrate diverse voices from Liverpool’s Black community.

The first is Addae, a member of Liverpool Tritons Inclusive Rugby Club. The Tritons, founded in 2016, is the first gay inclusive rugby team on Merseyside. They encourage new members from all backgrounds, ages, fitness levels, and rugby experience.

Tritons Rugby Club tshirt with a picture of Neptune holding a trident

Liverpool Tritons Inclusive Rugby Club t-shirt worn at Liverpool Pride, 30 July 2016; the day the club was officially launched. You can see this t-shirt on display in Tales from the city exhibition

Addae, tells us more about what the Club means to him:

“When I recently relocated to Liverpool from Trinidad & Tobago, via London, I realized that I wasn’t particularly fond of the area. Liverpool was cold, damp, and windy, and understanding the Scouse dialect seemed more of a task than a pleasure. I didn’t feel like I belonged here.

Frequently bored and uninspired, the only solace that I found was from running and reading, until I got the opportunity to leave. One day while I was leaving the Liverpool Central Library (which I consider a literary oasis), and although I had been there innumerable times, on that day my eyes were drawn to a flyer that had the holy words, ‘Liverpool Tritons: Inclusive Rugby’.  Read more…

Get out there and make yourself heard!

10 September 2018 by Kay

Woman in red shirt

Maggie O’Carroll, Chief Executive of The Women’s Organisation. Image credit: The Women’s Organisation: Twenty One Women

Here at the Museum of Liverpool we work in partnership with many groups and organisations – we firmly believe that together we are stronger. Read more…

Being a Museum Exhibit – My Story! By Richard Oswick

5 September 2018 by Kay

Boy and dog

Richard Oswick outside his home on Cantsfield Street. Courtesy of Richard Oswick

The Secret Life of Smithdown Road display uncovered and shared the stories of this fascinating community, past and present. Much of the content of the display was sourced from local residents, shop keepers and members of our Facebook group. The Museum also interviewed and recorded a range of people and made a special film about life on the Road. Read more…

Discovering Hispanic Liverpool legacies – The Perez family

29 August 2018 by Kay

Woman in garden

Rosario in the green house at Buena Ventura. Image courtesy of the Perez Family.

Recently we held a successful ‘Hispanic Liverpool’ drop-in event at the Museum of Liverpool in partnership with the University of Warwick. Read more…

Get groovy in our 1960s extravaganza!

3 August 2018 by Matt

Museum objects

Memorabilia from the decade available to handle

Think of the 1960s and The Beatles won’t be far from many people’s thoughts. Their appearances at the London Palladium and the Ed Sullivan Show made them nationally and then internationally famous.

While all that was happening there was another influential figure emphatically putting Liverpool on the map. Bill Shankly’s Liverpool were on the rise, playing a brand of swashbuckling football under their manager’s passionate and charismatic leadership. 1966 may be the year England won the World Cup but for us it was the year that Everton won the FA Cup and Liverpool won the league championship 3-2 against Sheffield Wednesday.

There was no denying it: Liverpool was cool.  It’s that coolness that we’ll be celebrating with a week of free activities  in our 1960s extravaganza from 6 August!

Adult and child doing craft

Make your own Ford Anglia © Dave Jones

Make your own Ford Anglia, an iconic 1960s car made right here in Liverpool on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Try your hand with real 1960s games like the Etch-a-Sketch and Spirograph from Monday through to Thursday.

Celebrating 50 years since the launch of The Beatle’s White Album by making your own album cover craft work on Tuesday and Thursday.

We’ll have handling objects for you to relive the decade with, including records, radios, toys, games, clothing, and even some things to get you remembering your school days.

 

Remembering the World Cup 1966 – the Merseyside connection

18 June 2018 by Kay

 The cover of a visitor guide to Liverpool for football fans at the World Cup 1966

A visitor guide to Liverpool for football fans at the World Cup 1966

1966 was a good year for football on Merseyside….oh, and for England too!  When the World Cup was held in this country in July that year, Liverpool had just won the League and Everton the FA Cup.

In the museum’s collections we have a number of items which relate to World Cup matches played at Goodison Park, including match tickets, a visitor guide to the city for fans, an invite and menu from a special luncheon given by The Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Liverpool on the occasion of the semi-final of the World Cup at the Town Hall, Liverpool City Transport tickets for overseas visitors and spectator notices.

Tickets from the five games held at Goodison Park were recently kindly donated by Jack Mulvey, an Everton fan. He tells us more – Read more…

Liverpool and the Larrinagas: drop-in afternoon 2 June

21 May 2018 by Kay

Photograph album with old family photos inside

Image copyright John Turton for the Hispanic Liverpool Project

Kirsty Hooper, Head of Hispanic Studies at the University of Warwick, tells us more about an exciting upcoming event held in partnership with the Museum of Liverpool:

“Did you or your family work for the Larrinaga company, at sea, in their Liverpool offices or in one of their family homes around Sefton Park?

Does your family have connections with Liverpool’s Hispanic community?

Do you have information, stories or photographs that you would like to share?

We would love to hear from you at our drop-in event at the Museum of Liverpool, Saturday 2 June 1-4pm. Read more…

Remembering the Liverpool carters

14 May 2018 by Sharon

horse statue with garlands of paper flowers draped around it

Monument to the working horse decorated with paper flowers

Every year at the Museum of Liverpool we hold an afternoon of events and activities to celebrate the work of the Liverpool carters and their horses, linked to the traditional carters’ May Day celebrations. Our 2018 event took place under a lovely blue sky. Our talks on ‘Animals in the First World War’ and ‘Liverpool Parades and Shows’ were well attended and everyone enjoyed making colourful paper flowers for our memorial ceremony.

Frank Short has supported the event every year with his display of magnificent model carts. With a family background in carting Frank has always been fascinated by both horses and carts and spends many, many hours on his models. This year he has expanded into modelling clay figures to accompany the carts – with impressive results. Read more…

Pembroke pubs

2 May 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Daniel Edmonds, Research Lead on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project:

“Throughout its history Pembroke Place has been home to a number of different types of leisure activities, from roller-skating rinks to zoos. It probably comes as no surprise that a series of public houses and hotels also thrived in the area. Some of our researchers have been investigating the night-life of Pembroke Place and the history of its establishments.

The Pembroke Hotel was pre-eminent, with mentions of its events appearing in both the local and national press. Throughout the late-Victorian Era, this local fixture hosted numerous gatherings attended by local dignitaries. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.