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Our top six gifts for Pre-Raphaelite fans

11 February 2016 by Lisa

william-morris-ties

We’ve found that fans of the Pre-Raphaelite movement are among the most passionate art fans out there!

Whether you’re a Pre-Raphaelite buff yourself or you know someone who loves all things Rossetti,  we have plenty to browse in our Pre-Raphaelites online shop. Read more…

Portrait of a sailor

11 February 2016 by Ellie

Portrait of Stoker 1st Class Joseph Norman Thomas

MMM.2014.39

In 2014 we acquired this rather striking portrait of Royal Navy Stoker 1st Class Joseph Norman Thomas, who was born in Liverpool in 1892. At Merseyside Maritime Museum, we focus on the history of the Merchant Navy, with some exceptions, but we were drawn to this painting as we have very few portraits of seafarers in the collection. Joseph also had very strong local connections, being born and brought up in Liverpool. Read more…

Pin curls and paintings

10 February 2016 by Ann

Illustration by W. A Brown courtesy of Mrs G Harrand

Illustration by W. A Brown courtesy of Mrs G Harrand

The striking 1930s evening dresses from the Putting on the Glitz exhibition would not have been complete when originally worn without a beautiful hairstyle to finish the look.  This half term, the Lady Lever Art Gallery is hosting a unique event in partnership with Andrew Collinge Hairdressing to show the modern woman and man how dressing to impress really should be done.

Read more…

A room with a view, Valentine’s Day at the Maritime Dining Room

10 February 2016 by Stacey

couple having a romantic meal in the Maritime Dining Room

Valentines Day is a time when couples try to search out that perfect place to dine with their loved one, or that unique gift to express their appreciation for their other half.

Tim Eccles, Duty Manager at the Maritime Dining Room, can certainly help with the first dilemma.

Tucked away on the top floor of the Maritime Museum, with enviable views over the picturesque Albert Dock and stunning Liverpool Waterfront, the Maritime Dining Room offers delicious regional food made in-house by our talented team of award winning chefs. A romantic and beautiful setting, it is the perfect place to escape from the busy city centre and enjoy delicious food with great company. Read more…

Works begin on Museum of Liverpool steps and terraces

9 February 2016 by Lucy

Image of Museum of Liverpool

Works on the steps and terraces outside the Museum of Liverpool begin this week

This week, we have started work on the external steps and terraces at each end of the Museum of Liverpool.

On completion in December this year, the north and south ends of the Museum will feature seating, terraces and steps, leading to two viewing platforms offering unique observation points of the city, River Mersey and Liverpool Bay.

The construction process will consist of two phases. The first will remove the original steps and terraces structure, which will then be replaced with a steel frame and pre-cast concrete design during the second phase.

 

 

Phil Redmond, Chair of National Museums Liverpool, said:

“It’s great to begin the year with this good news for the Museum of Liverpool, and we’re looking forward to creating something special on the waterfront that will bring long-term benefits to everyone enjoying the area. We intend to work with neighbours, partners and the public to make use of the viewing platforms for future events, making them a great addition to Liverpool’s iconic waterfront.”

During the construction period, if you are visiting the Museum on foot from Albert Dock, pedestrian access will take visitors behind the Museum via the Riverside Walkway to the main entrance at the front. The access route to the main entrance from the direction of the Pier Head will be as normal.

The Museum will remain open as usual during the project, but there may be short periods when small areas of the building are closed. The Your visit page will be updated with the latest information, so please check before you visit.

Brookie: A few LGBT ‘firsts’ and a kiss that went global

5 February 2016 by Matt

Phil Redmond sitting by a 'Brookside Close' street sign

© Liverpool Daily Post and Echo

Working on the Pride and Prejudice project means that I spend a lot of my time thinking about the story of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans people in Liverpool. February is LGBT History Month in the United Kingdom and this means a whole month where a lot of people are thinking about the history of LGBT people.

Sometimes LGBT history can crop up in rather unexpected places. Did you know that the Liverpool-based soap opera Brookside was responsible for a few LGBT ‘firsts’ not just in the UK but internationally?  Read more…

The Pre-Raphaelites, definitely beautiful and most certainly rebellious!

4 February 2016 by Ann

The English Boy, 1860, Ford Madox Brown © Manchester City Galleries

The English Boy, 1860, Ford Madox Brown © Manchester City Galleries

The countdown has begun to the opening of our breath-taking exhibition Pre-Raphaelites: Beauty and Rebellion on 12 February at the Walker Art Gallery. Installation of the works is underway and the excitement is building..

Among the 120 paintings to be displayed are familiar faces including Manchester Art Gallery’s The English Boy and Rossetti’s glorious Monna Vanna from the collection at Tate.  There’s also wonderful pictures by local artists who were influenced by the Pre-Raphaelite ideals. Burd Helen by William L. Windus (pictured below) and painted in 1856, is a lovely example, and was described by John Ruskin as “a great Pre-Raphaelite painting”, he went on to state it was “thoughtful and intense to the highest imaginative power”. Read more…

Explore our Roman past

3 February 2016 by Liz

Roman coins

Roman denarii coins from the Malpas Hoard

To coincide with our forthcoming exhibition, Roman Treasures of Cheshire, there’s a great opportunity to explore the Roman past of north west England in detail at a forthcoming day conference. The Cheshire Hoards and the Romano-British North West conference will run on Saturday 27 February at the Museum of Liverpool. Archaeologists from around the country will present the latest research about finds and explore the context of settlement in this region.

The Cheshire Hoards are two groups of Roman Treasure, the Malpas Hoard and the Knutsford Hoard.  These have both recently been reported through the Portable Antiquities Scheme and have now been acquired by Museum of Liverpool and Congleton Museum jointly through a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.  Read more…

Artist, Rae Hicks: “…it gave me a huge boost of confidence and validation”

2 February 2016 by Lisa

Artists clapping at a private view

From left to right: Angela Samata (John Moores Painting Prize) and artists Rose Wylie, Rae Hicks, Mandy Payne, Juliette Losque and Alessandro Raho.

A prize-winner at the John Moores Painting Prize in 2014, artist Rae Hicks has been speaking to us about his experience of being part of the John Moores and the effect it has had on his career:  Read more…

Poppies – a botanist’s view

1 February 2016 by Geraldine

pressed yellow poppies mounted on paper

Welsh poppy, Meconopsis cambrica. This specimen was collected in May 1949 from Hawkshead, Cumbria. Accession number 1987.376.98

As a botanist I was fascinated to see the Poppies: Women and War exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool, which includes botanical photographs of poppies in the field and draws on themes of strength and resilience inspired by the flower.

Poppies always invoke for me a feeling of happiness, large colourful flowers in bright garish colours. ‘Poppy’ refers to a group of species that cover a number of genera in the family Papaveraceae. The one that springs to mind for most people is Papaver rhoeas which is used as the symbol of remembrance and hope.  Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.