Our venues


Double Fantasy John & Yoko

20 March 2018 by Laura

John and Yoko

Photo by Keith McMillan (c) Yoko Ono

On what would have been the couple’s 49th wedding anniversary we are very proud to announce a major new exhibition, telling the story of John Lennon and Yoko Ono Lennon’s profound personal and creative chemistry at the Museum of Liverpool. Read more…

A tour for the senses

19 March 2018 by Steven Williams

Museum display with wooden flaps to lift with smells of goods from Liverpool's docks

The ‘Smells galore’ interactive in The Great Port gallery is just one of the sensory experiences at the Museum of Liverpool.

Liverpool is a city that has undoubtedly left its mark on history: world famous long before The Beatles, its rise, fall and rise again is a rich story of innovation and struggle, suffering and prosperity.

The Museum of Liverpool exists to tell this story, displaying a diverse selection of objects in a modern, purpose built museum for all to see. But what if you couldn’t see the objects, what if you couldn’t hear the audio descriptions or engage with the interactive exhibits?

These questions led to the development of ‘sensory tours’: an opportunity to be guided around the museum discovering artefacts and exhibits that can be interacted with in a number of different ways. Read more…

Tickets available for after-hours Terracotta Warriors events

16 March 2018 by Eleanor Webster


© Gareth Jones

Since our China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors exhibition opened at World Museum, visitors have hailed the exhibition as a ‘once in-a-lifetime experience’. The exhibition not only showcases a number of objects which have never been seen before in the UK, but it is also just the third time that the terracotta warriors have been on show in the UK – and the first time they have come to Liverpool – since their discovery in 1974.
Read more…

Hard sweat: Liverpool’s garment district

16 March 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Susan Bennett, volunteer researcher working on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project. This Heritage Lottery Fund-supported project is exploring the history of this fascinating Liverpool street in all its facets:

“Cobblers, boot and shoemakers, tailors, all manner of drapers, wool, linen and silk merchants, all leapt out of the pages of Liverpool Street Directories in my research Read more…

Hooray for Hoppy

15 March 2018 by Kristina Zavros

Melissa and hoppy in Big Art

Here in Big Art, we had spring in our steps as we welcomed visitors to our ‘share a story’ themed Toddler Time sessions celebrating World Book Day 2018.

We shared the feel-good book ‘Hooray for Hoppy’ by author Tim Hopgood, about a little rabbit called Hoppy who is eagerly awaiting the arrival of spring ( like most of us at the moment).

Read more…

Competition: Win a signed Lubaina Himid poster

12 March 2018 by Mannika Dhadwal

It’s your last chance to see Turner Prize winner Lubaina Himid’s exhibition ‘Meticulous Observations and Naming the Money’ at the Walker. To celebrate this powerful exhibition, featuring works by women artists all selected by Lubaina, we’re giving away six exhibition posters signed by the award-winning artist herself!

Read more…

‘Frontstage and backstage at the Magic Clock, Easter lunchtime 1969’

12 March 2018 by Kay

pub in a city street

The Magic Clock, Roe Street, 1968. Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office, Liverpool Libraries.

Dr Jo Stanley, creative historian, made a textile artwork of the interior of the Magic Clock pub, Roe Street, Liverpool, especially for our Tales from the city exhibition. Jo, originally from Crosby, was a barmaid at the pub, over Christmas 1968 and Easter 1969, in vacations from teacher training college.

The Magic Clock was popular with gay men. It was situated in Liverpool’s original ‘gay quarter’ around Queen Square. Read more…

Meticulous observations by women at the Walker

9 March 2018 by Beth Lewis

It’s been a real privilege to work on Lubaina Himid’s exhibition Meticulous Observations and Naming the Money here at the Walker. Lubaina is a truly inspirational figure and her display here presents the work of a number of other groundbreaking women artists.

Lubaina Himid

Artist Lubaina Himid

Read more…

Ann Davison – the first woman to sail the Atlantic single-handed

9 March 2018 by Ellie

Ann Davison and her boat Felicity Ann

Ann with ‘FA’ at the New York Boat Show. Image courtesy of Shelly Randall. Copyright unknown.

This week National Museums Liverpool is celebrating International Women’s Day through displays, talks and events at many of our venues.

I want to share the story of Ann Davison (1914-1992), a amazing woman who was the embodiment of strength, courage and determination. She was a skilled pilot, a gifted author, an intrepid adventurer, and the first woman to sail the Atlantic single-handed.

“It wasn’t courage that sent me scurrying across the ocean. It was a little curiosity and a lot of desperation that went into the making of that particular dream…”

Last October I was lucky enough to attend an event at Mere Brook House, Wirral, to unveil of a blue plaque commemorating Ann. Until then I admit that I didn’t really have any knowledge of her, but when I started reading about her I was immediately drawn to her audacious nature and fearlessness.  Read more…

10 Black Women Achievers celebrated in Museum

8 March 2018 by Richard

Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock. Space Scientist; STFC fellow for public outreach. Photographed in Astrium EAD’s semi-anechoic (satellite) testing chamber, in Portsmouth. Image © Max Alexander.

Here at the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, we have added 10 new Black women achievers on to our Black Achievers Wall this March as part of the 100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage.

The new additions include an inspirational list of women from various professions and backgrounds who have been – and are – pioneers.

From the first Black woman to have a film produced by a major Hollywood studio to the first Black woman to sit in the cabinet of the UK government, these achievers have set the bar for future generations to aspire to.

We are also pleased to announce two Liverpool based achievers, Michelle Charters, CEO of the Kuumba Imani Centre and Councillor Anna Rothery, Mayoral Lead for Equalities, who continue to support the BAME communities in the city and actively fight ongoing discrimination and prejudice.

The full list is:

  • Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock

Scientist, educator and science advocate. Maggie Aderin-Pocock is an honorary research fellow in University College London’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. In 2009 she received an MBE for her services to science and education. In 2014 she became co-presenter of the long-running TV programme The Sky at Night.

  • Baroness Valerie Amos

Born in British Guiana (now Guyana), she became the first Black woman to sit in the UK Cabinet when Secretary of State for International Development in 2003. She served as UN Undersecretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator and in 2015 became Director of SOAS University of London

  • Michelle Charters

Community Activist and CEO of Kuumba Imani Millennium Centre in Toxteth, Liverpool   The multi-purpose centre was the vision of the Liverpool Black Sisters, an organisation formed in the 1970’s to address the many forms of discrimination experienced by the Black community. She is the Founding Chair of the Merseyside Black History Month Group and first Black woman to be appointed a Trustee of the Everyman & Playhouse Theatres in Liverpool

  • Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm

    Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm. Brooklyn born politician and educator who became the first Black US congresswoman. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

Brooklyn born politician and educator who became the first Black US congresswoman. A founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus and National Women’s Political Caucus. In 1972 she campaigned for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination.

  • Lois K. Alexander Lane

Arkansas born founder of the Harlem Institute of Fashion (1966) and the Black Fashion Museum in New York City (1979). The Institute offered free courses on dressmaking, millinery and tailoring. Lane wrote Blacks in the History of Fashion (1982) which dispelled the myth that Black people were newcomers to the fashion industry.

  • Wangari Maathai

Internationally renowned Kenyan environmental activist and politician. Wangari Maathai founded the Green Belt Movement empowering local communities to work together to combat de-forestation and protect their environment and their future. In 2004, she became the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, for ‘her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace’.

  • Zanele Muholi

Photographer and visual activist. Zanele Muholi aims to use her photography to effect social change. An ardent advocate of LGBT+ communities everywhere, she has become known globally with her series of pioneering portrait photography of South Africa’s LGBT+ communities. Her work is represented in museums and collections around the world.

  • Euzhan Palcy

Martinique born film director, writer and producer. The first Black director to win a French César award for the acclaimed 1983 film Sugar Cane Alley (Rue Cases Nègres). In 1989 she was the first Black woman to have a film produced by a major Hollywood studio. The film, A Dry White Season, looked at the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa

  • Paulette Randall

London born theatre and television director. A former Artistic Director of the Black led Talawa Theatre Company; Paulette Randall has directed and produced numerous productions, including collaborating on the spectacular opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games. She received an MBE in 2015 for her services to drama.

  • Anna Rothery

Labour Councillor for Princes Park Ward in Liverpool since 2006. Anna Rothery has been active in promoting participation of BAME (Black Asian and Minority Ethnic) communities in civic life. She became the first Liverpool Councillor to speak on the floor at the United Nations in 2012 and was made Mayoral Lead for Equalities with specific responsibility for race equality in 2017.

Euzhan Palcy. Martinique born film director, writer and producer. In 1989 she was the first Black woman to have a film produced by a major Hollywood studio, A Dry White Season, which looked at the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. Image © Presidence de la République _ P. Segrette.

About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.




We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.