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Posts by Karen O'Rourke

Captain Noel Chavasse (VC and Bar, MC) remembered.

4 August 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

Sculpture

The Liverpool Heroes Memorial in Abercromby Square is situated close to the Bishop’s Palace, the Chavasse family home from 1900. The statue depicts Noel and a stretcher-bearer rescuing a soldier. Image courtesy Bill Sergeant

In my blog on Monday, marking the start of the Third Battle of Ypres, I mentioned that Noel Chavasse had received a second Victoria Cross award, for his actions in the first days of the Battle.

Noel Chavasse is a well known local War hero and I often find myself saying that he was awarded for bravery, but don’t always have the opportunity to give the actual details of what he did: Read more…

Passchendaele Remembered

31 July 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

medals

Captain Noel Chavasse (VC and Bar, MC) medal group on public display in Liverpool for the first time at Museum of Liverpool until Jan 2018. Image Courtesy of the Lord Ashcroft Collection © IWM

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the start of the Third Battle of Ypres, also known as Passchendaele. Read more…

Aidan Chavasse – centenary of the death of Noel Chavasse’s younger brother.

4 July 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

Soldier

Lieutenant Aidan Chavasse

In the coming weeks, there will be much written about Captain Noel Chavasse VC, as the 100th anniversary of his death on 4 August 1917 approaches. Read more…

Bootle man, Arthur Procter VC, honoured in new memorial

25 April 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

Soldier

Arthur Herbert Procter

This morning there was a ceremony at the Freemason Hall in London, to unveil a memorial commemorating the 64 freemasons who were awarded the Victoria Cross during the First World War. One of the men featured was Arthur Herbert Procter, who served with the King’s Liverpool Regiment. Read more…

Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps

8 March 2017 by Karen O'Rourke

Poster

‘Women Urgently Wanted’ © IWM (Art.IWM PST 13171)

As soon as war had been declared in August 1914, women had begun ‘doing their bit’ towards the war effort. Initially they worked as nurses, shop staff or office clerks, but as the war progressed, women took on roles that were traditionally more masculine, such as tram conductors, farm labourers and munitions workers. Read more…

Somme centenary: the Battle of Ancre

16 November 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

Map

Map of the Battle of Ancre. The red lines indicate the trenches, with the thicker lines showing the British and German front lines on 13 November.

Since 1 July, I have been blogging about some of the significant attacks in the Battle of the Somme involving the King’s Liverpool Regiment. This is the final one of the series. Read more…

Somme centenary: the Battle of Le Transloy

18 October 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

portrait photo of a soldier in uniform

Victoria Cross Winner David Jones was killed on 7 October 1916, before he could receive his award.

The Battle for Guillemont stalled the left flank of the British Army for six weeks in the summer of 1916. September saw a renewed push forward and by the end of the month, the Allies controlled the ground as far as Les Boefs and Gueudecourt.

The War led to tactical and technological advances on both sides and German commanders employed a new tactic, deploying machine guns using existing terrain as cover rather than fixed within their trench system. This strategy enabled them to hold ground with their already depleted forces. As the Allies advanced towards the ridge at Le Transloy, they would soon find out how effective this tactic would be.  Read more…

Somme centenary: the final attack on Guillemont

2 September 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

barren landscape with bare tree trunks stripped of branches and leaves

Guillemont after the September 1916 Somme battles

On 3 September 1916, after four unsuccessful attacks on the village of Guillemont, the British Army, as part of a wider push, launched another assault. Once again, men from the King’s Regiment were involved, this time from the 12th Battalion.

The Battalion had been in and out of the trenches to the west of the village from mid August and had already experienced some casualties. On 3 September, at 12 noon, the Battalion went ‘over the top’ to capture Guillemont. They moved through Trones Wood and across the exposed flat land to the west of the village. Read more…

Somme centenary: the battle for Guillemont continues

9 August 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

rows of gravestones in a cemetary in the French countryside

Guillemont Road Cemetery, where many King’s Regiment soldiers are buried

As night fell on 8 August 1916, a few of the men from the 1st Battalion had escaped the attack and found their way back to the British Front Line. Of the hundreds of men in the battalion, who had gone over the top that morning, only 180 were available to answer their names at roll call. The battle for the village of Guillemont described in yesterday’s blog continued however, as the remaining men of the 8th (Irish) Battalion were still trapped in the village. Read more…

Somme centenary: the third attack on Guillemont 

8 August 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

map of Guillemont, France

This map shows the position of the Territorials and 1st Battalion (marked in blue), in the third attack on the village. The arrows show their proposed movement to their objective lines.

In the early hours of 31 July 1916, after two failed attacks on the Village of Guillemont, the depleted Liverpool Pals Battalions left the Front Line – but the Liverpool story continued. The 55th Division, which replaced them, included the six Territorial Battalions of the King’s Liverpool Regiment. Known as the ‘Liverpool Terriers’, they had all been in action since 1915 and were already experienced in battle.

The third attack on the village was planned for 4.20am on 8 August. Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.