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Somme centenary: the battle for Guillemont continues

9 August 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

rows of gravestones in a cemetary in the French countryside

Guillemont Road Cemetery, where many King’s Regiment soldiers are buried

As night fell on 8 August 1916, a few of the men from the 1st Battalion had escaped the attack and found their way back to the British Front Line. Of the hundreds of men in the battalion, who had gone over the top that morning, only 180 were available to answer their names at roll call. The battle for the village of Guillemont described in yesterday’s blog continued however, as the remaining men of the 8th (Irish) Battalion were still trapped in the village. Read more…

Somme centenary: the third attack on Guillemont 

8 August 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

map of Guillemont, France

This map shows the position of the Territorials and 1st Battalion (marked in blue), in the third attack on the village. The arrows show their proposed movement to their objective lines.

In the early hours of 31 July 1916, after two failed attacks on the Village of Guillemont, the depleted Liverpool Pals Battalions left the Front Line – but the Liverpool story continued. The 55th Division, which replaced them, included the six Territorial Battalions of the King’s Liverpool Regiment. Known as the ‘Liverpool Terriers’, they had all been in action since 1915 and were already experienced in battle.

The third attack on the village was planned for 4.20am on 8 August. Read more…

New British spider found in Liverpool

8 August 2016 by Tony

A female Dendryphantes rudis

A female Dendryphantes rudis. Image by Richard Gallon.

I recently attended a ‘bioblitz’  at the 1984 Festival Gardens site in Liverpool along with zoology staff from World Museum.

The site is managed by The Conservation Volunteers on behalf of the Land Trust and has recently been extensively remodeled as a public green space.

Read more…

Getting dressed in the 18th century

3 August 2016 by Lynn

Mrs Paine and her Daughters (1975), Sir Joshua Reynolds (c) National Museums Liverpool

Mrs Paine and her Daughters (1975), Sir Joshua Reynolds (c) National Museums Liverpool

Costume curator Pauline Rushton explores what it was like for women to get dressed in the 18th century.

“Getting ourselves dressed in the morning is one of the everyday things we all take for granted, along with brushing our hair and our teeth. But what would it feel like to have someone else dress you every day? In the 18th century, provided you had enough money and could afford to pay servants, that would be the norm, especially if you were a woman. In any case, clothes could be so complicated that you wouldn’t be able to get into them easily without someone else’s assistance. Ideas about privacy and intimacy were different then too – it was normal to be touched by a servant if they were helping you wash or dress.

Read more…

The Oratory – a look inside one of our lesser known buildings

3 August 2016 by Jen

The Oratory at night with the steps covered in candles for a special event.

The Oratory at night with the steps covered in candles for a special event.

We often use our blog to highlight our fantastic collections, they are after all the most obvious asset of any museum or gallery. This time however I’d like to shift the focus to something a little different, because here at National Museums Liverpool we are extremely fortunate to be able to house our incredible collections in stunning buildings that are architecturally, historically and culturally significant in their own right. Read more…

Finding Dory… at World Museum’s aquarium!

1 August 2016 by Lisa

Blue fish with a yellow tail - 'Finding Dory' blog

A Regal Tang

If you’ve watched ‘Finding Dory’ at the weekend, then you might want to read on and find out more about the beautiful blue Regal Tang (Paracanthurus hepatus) – which is the real life fish she’s based on! We asked aquarist Alyster Chapman from our Aquarium, to tell us more about these stunning fish and why it’s important to keep them in the wild: Read more…

Talk Tuesday: John Moores 2016 artist, Nicholas Middleton

29 July 2016 by Lisa

Nicholas at the John Moores 2016 exhibition.

Nicholas at the John Moores 2016 exhibition.

What inspires our John Moores Painting Prize artists? Nicholas Middleton is an artist who has been selected five times for the John Moores over the past 12 years – this year his painting ‘Figures in an Arch’ has been chosen for the exhibition.

We caught up with him to find out more about how he works, ahead of his ‘Talk Tuesday’ event happening at the Walker Art Gallery on Tuesday 2 August. Read more…

‘Trade’ – exhibition provides inspiration for new theatre venture

28 July 2016 by Alison

Jogini - wedding ceremony

Jogini – wedding ceremony

In June last year ‘Broken Lives – Slavery in Modern India’ opened at the International Slavery Museum, a powerful and moving exhibition revealing stories of hardship, survival and hope for broken lives mended.

The exhibition (open until 11 December), delivered in partnership with the Dalit Freedom Network, focuses on the victims of modern slavery in India, most of who are ‘Dalits’. Many Dalits still experience marginalisation and prejudice, live in extreme poverty and are vulnerable to human trafficking and bonded labour.

Feedback from visitors to the exhibition has been incredible, for one particular individual though their visit has left a lasting impression… Read more…

National Museums Liverpool has Pride!

28 July 2016 by Matt

MOL.2015.99.1

I remember my first Liverpool Pride, back in 2010. I was finishing off my university year and I stumbled across it quite by accident. Needless to say I had an amazing time and funnily enough I will be having another Pride first this year.

On Saturday, for the first time ever, National Museums Liverpool will have a stall at Liverpool Pride where we’ll be showcasing the work we’ve been carrying out as part of our Pride and Prejudice project. Read more…

Our classical collections feature in Biennial exhibition at Tate Liverpool

27 July 2016 by Andrew

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

Ancient Greece episode at Tate Liverpool

In April, we told you about Chrissy Partheni, Curator of Antiquities at World Museum and her involvement with this year’s Biennial in Liverpool – read it here. Working alongside curators at Tate Liverpool and Biennial, we were able to loan objects from our classical collections, in particular from Henry Blundell’s sculptural collections, forming part of the Biennial Ancient Greece Episode exhibition there. Chrissy says: Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.