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Victorian Treasures: to Japan and back

11 January 2017 by Alex Patterson

Victorian Treasures is a new exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery featuring some of the world’s most famous 19th– and early 20th– century Pre-Raphaelite and Romantic paintings. It’s been a long time in the making and has traveled thousands of miles already – from Liverpool to Japan and back…. Read more…

Tokens from the Roman Empire

10 January 2017 by Denise Wilding

PhD student Denise identifying Roman coins

Denise identifying Roman coins © Portable Antiquities Scheme

I’m a PhD student at Warwick University and a member of a European research project investigating the role tokens played in everyday life in the ancient world. My focus is on the Roman period and I am currently looking at tokens from Egypt. As part of my research I visited the World Museum collections… Read more…

The weird and wonderful jobs of Pembroke Place

9 January 2017 by Liz

Street sign for Pembroke Place

Today we have a guest blog from Richard MacDonald, a freelance historical researcher and Blue Badge Guide. Richard is leading a team of volunteers investigating historic street directories as part of the Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project.

“Have you ever been in the awkward situation of finding yourself with a filthy ostrich feather and not knowing how best to clean it? Read more…

Talk Tuesday: Looking North artist Mary Griffiths

6 January 2017 by Scott Smith

Looking North artist Mary Griffiths in front of her artworks

Artist Mary Griffiths in front of her artworks.

Mary Griffiths is one of the artists featured in Looking North, a new exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery that presents work by artists from the North-West of England.

Mary is from the Wirral and lives in Manchester. She graduated from the MA Fine Art at Manchester School of Art in 2009 and is now Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Whitworth, Manchester.

We caught up with her to find out more about how she works, ahead of her ‘Talk Tuesday’ event happening at the Walker Art Gallery on Tuesday 10th January… Read more…

New Year, New Jewellery!

30 December 2016 by Stacey

mixed-flowers-handmade-silver-bracelet

Shrieking Violet Mixed Flowers Bracelet, £45 available online and from Walker Art Gallery and Museum of Liverpool

Post-Christmas sale shopping is always manic and we think it’s better to treat yourself to something you really want, rather than making impulse buys you might regret later.

With this in mind, our retail team have been selecting beautiful, high-quality gifts that reflect the artistry and creativity of our museums and galleries. Throughout the year, they have been busy sourcing new jewellery so that ladies from across the Liverpool region can sparkle in 2017. They have come across some fantastic jewellery companies based in the UK, each with their own individual story. Below Karen Taylor, our Assistant Merchandising Manager, tells us more about these unique jewellery suppliers and picks her favourites from each hand-crafted collection.

Read more…

The mysterious Master of Frankfurt

22 December 2016 by Scott Smith

virgin-and-child

‘The Holy Family with Music Making Angels’ by the Master of Frankfurt

‘The Holy Family with Music Making Angels’ by the mysterious ‘Master of Frankfurt’ is one of the many glorious 16th century paintings in the Walker Art Gallery’s collection. Whilst undertaking restoration of the painting, our conservator David Crombie discovered that the anonymous painter may have left more of himself in the painting than he realised…

Read more…

The King of Kaputa: life as a trader in 19th century Africa

21 December 2016 by Zachary

Eshira beaded belt with English-made metal buckle, collected in Gabon by J.G.C. Harrison and said to have been made by the niece of a King named Ngorlay.

The Harrison group of Central African objects can now be seen online. It is an important early collection, because it is unusually well documented for its time. The museum’s records relating to Harrison’s donations, which were made in 1879 and 1883, are still relatively brief but they suggest that Harrison acquired the artefacts through his close personal relationships with Central Africans.  Read more…

‘The Star’ and 150 years of the Liverpool Playhouse

20 December 2016 by Laura

Building

The Playhouse as we know it began life as the Star Music Hall in 1866 and became a theatre in 1911.

The Liverpool Playhouse‘s Christmas show, ‘The Star’, is written by Michael Wynne from Birkenhead. In this guest blog Michael reveals how the show came about:


Read more…

Magical Meccano Christmas Window

19 December 2016 by Stacey

student-window-display-meccanoHugh Baird University Centre undergraduate designs Blackler’s Santa themed window for Museum of Liverpool

Museum of Liverpool’s shop has teamed up with the Hugh Baird University Centre to create a unique Christmas window display to celebrate the iconic Blackler’s Santa, currently on display in the Museum atrium.

First year undergraduates from the Foundation Degree in Visual Merchandising and Promotional Design – which is validated by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) – were tasked with a brief by the Museum’s retail team to create a visual display in its shop window. They were asked to reflect an iconic figure from Liverpool’s retail history, the giant Santa that used to stand at the centre of Blackler’s department store. Until its closure in 1988 Blackler’s was located on the corner of Elliot Street and Great Charlotte Street and was famous for its amazing Winter Wonderland Grottos which attracted more than 10,000 visitors a week. Read more…

Worse things happen at sea

19 December 2016 by Ellie

man at the Liverpool waterfront

Eugene McLaughlin in Liverpool

Today marks a First World War anniversary that many of us will not have heard about before. Our guest blogger Eugene McLaughlin explains why he is visiting Merseyside Maritime Museum today to remember his grandfather’s fateful voyage 100 years ago.

“My grandfather died when I was a baby.  I knew very little about him.  I knew he was from Sligo, he was a sailor and he was once Captain of the Galway Bay tender SS Dun Aengus.  I recall childhood tales that he was the Captain of a ship that was torpedoed during “the” war, which I assumed to be the Second World War.  My grandmother had given me two of his brass buttons from his time at sea.  Other than that, nothing.

So, when my wife gave me a Christmas present of a subscription to an ancestry research website, I had to investigate.  Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.