Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'archaeology'

Processing clay tobacco pipes with the archaeology department!

27 February 2014 by Sam Rowe

Copyright National Museums Liverpool

Emily working on the pipe collection

Here is a post from one of our volunteers on the Rainford’s Roots community archaeology project.  Emily spent time with the archaeology team archiving over 8,000 clay pipes; here she explains the stages of recording: Read more…

Behind the scenes archaeology tours

17 January 2014 by Liz

Volunteer with pot he excavated in Rainford

We’ve been digging in Rainford in 2013 as part of the Rainford’s Roots Project.  We’ve found thousands of fascinating finds which reveal information about the historic cottage industry of ‘potting’ in the village.  Volunteers on the project have helped wash and catalogue many of these finds, and in due course they will become part of the collection of the Museum of Liverpool Read more…

Calderstones and HER Research

6 December 2013 by Sam

ancient carvings on a large stone

Calderstones. Photograph by George Nash and Adam Stanford © Aerial-Cam

Over the last two months, three students from the University of Liverpool have been working with the Archaeology department on placements. They have worked on a range of tasks around archaeological collections, research, education and exhibitions. One student, Alys Randall-Smith, has blogged about the work she has undertaken using the Merseyside Historic Environment Record for her research. Read more…

Ancient World News!

24 October 2013 by Gina

1966.177

Are you planning a visit World Museum during the half-term break? You mustn’t miss our new case in the Ancient World Gallery on Level 3, with objects which have never been on display before. Caring for our collections is one of our on-going jobs, and I am very grateful to Steve, our metals conservator, and Jan, our ceramics conservator, for their help in getting these objects on display. Read more…

The end of Pompeii

23 August 2013 by Gina

56.19.175View1

Let’s go back in time to 23rd August AD 79, to a little town on the Bay of Naples called Pompeii. Little did the inhabitants know that their world was going to be torn apart, quite literally, the following day when Mount Vesuvius, the volcano which overlooks the Bay of Naples, erupted. Read more…

A stitch in time

16 August 2013 by Gina

M6466

What do you think this little box was used for? The box is part of the fantastic Anglo-Saxon collection at World Museum, which I’m lucky enough to curate.

Here are a couple of clues:

The box once belonged to a woman who lived in Kent in the 6th or 7th century, and it was found in her grave.

Read more…

Upcoming community excavation

2 August 2013 by Sam Rowe

Volunteers on a Rainford's Roots excavation

Volunteers on a Rainford’s Roots excavation

The Rainford’s Roots project has just finished its programme of events for the Festival of Archaeology 2013, and is now preparing for its next community dig this August in Rainford, St Helens.

From 15-22 August the project will be at Rainford Library on Church Road, Rainford. A team of archaeologists and volunteers will be exploring the former site of a clay tobacco pipe shop which once stood on the site. This workshop was one of a number in operation in Rainford in the 19th century, producing tobacco pipes that were traded far and wide. The excavation will explore the history of the site and the team expect to uncover objects that were being manufactured and used in Rainford over 100 years ago. Read more…

Help an archaeologist!

25 July 2013 by Sam

archaeologist documenting objects from an excavation

Kerry processing finds from the Rainford’s Roots project

Here’s an update from Kerry Massheder, Community Archaeology Trainee, on this week’s events at the Museum of Liverpool:

“Yesterday Clare Ahmed, Archaeological Project Officer, and I ran the first of two  ‘Help an Archaeologist’ sessions this week. The interactive family sessions are being held as part of the Festival of Archaeology events at the Museum of Liverpool.

We had a really busy afternoon with lots of children and their families taking part in different hands-on activities, including a handling session involving Roman artefacts, sorting Post-Medieval finds, drawing, weighing and describing Roman and Post-Medieval finds to record them and helping on a simulated dig. We also had a number of craft activities including colouring sheets, worksheets, cutting and glueing tasks and quizzes. Read more…

Rainford’s Roots – community archaeology events

18 July 2013 by Sam Rowe

woman with a display stand with lots of archaeology info and pictures

Kerry, Community Archaeology Trainee, at Rainford Summer Festival

The Rainford’s Roots project is very busy this month, running a number of events in Liverpool and Rainford as part of the Festival of Archaeology 2013, 13 to 28 July 2013.

Rainford’s Roots is a community archaeology project, run by the Merseyside Archaeological Society and National Museums Liverpool, to explore the industrial heritage of Rainford village near St Helens. The project aims to widen participation and dissemination of community archaeology in the region. Read more…

Festival of Archaeology 2013

12 July 2013 by Liz

museum display of archaeological finds

Rainford’s Roots display

The Festival of Archaeology begins tomorrow some great free events for budding archaeologists of all ages. Come along to the Museum of Liverpool and World Museum to explore our archaeology collections with us during the Festival, 13 to 28 July 2013.

At Museum of Liverpool there are two special displays of recent finds: one from the internationally-important Mesolithic site at Lunt Meadows, Sefton; one from the community archaeology excavation at Rainford, St Helens. Read more…

About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

Award-winning blog

corpcomms awards winner logo

Subscribe

RSS RSS Feed

Disclaimer

We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.