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Posts tagged with 'conservation'

Large Mason Bee stamp

4 November 2015 by Paula

Female Large Mason Bee

Female Large Mason Bee

Carl Clee, an Honorary Curator at World Museum, has been coming into the museum most Tuesday’s and Thursdays for the last 25 years, or so. Carl  re-discovered the Large Mason Bee in the UK in 1998. It was previously thought to be extinct and we have been studying its ecology and promoting its conservation management for the last 15 years. Here Carl tells us about this fascinating bee: Read more…

The Truly scary thing about bats!

30 October 2015 by Paula

Stevie the brown long eared bat

Stevie the brown long eared bat

Bats have a bad reputation and have long been associated with Vampires and Halloween but the really scary thing about bats, in our opinion, is that all bats in Britain are endangered species. This means that they are protected by law, and it’s illegal to disturb a bat or its roost, except if you find an injured bat and need to bring it in for veterinary care.

Laura Carter, an Education Demonstrator at World Museum is a volunteer bat carer with the Bat Conservation Trust and here she tells us about some of her charges: Read more…

Tramcar 245 is launched!

18 September 2015 by Sharon

historic tram running on a tramline in Birkenhead

Tramcar 245 looking fantastic after restoration

As Curator of the Transport Collection at the Museum of Liverpool I work with a fantastic collection of vehicles, and over the years I have worked with some very special groups of people associated with these vehicles.

I first met members of the Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society (MTPS) about 18 years ago. Sitting on a restored tram at the Wirral Transport Museum they told me all about their work. I was really impressed by their skills and their enthusiasm for the work they did. When a request to restore Tramcar 245 came through from them a short while later I thought the tram couldn’t be in better hands.

Tramcar 245 has a special place in Liverpool’s transport story. Read more…

Dazzling tea cosies for the Edmund Gardner

3 September 2015 by Sam

colourful tea cosy in front of a ship painted with a similar pattern

Gina’s dazzle ship inspired tea cosy

This summer Chris Moseley, shipkeeping and models conservator, took over responsibility for the Edmund Gardner pilot ship – the largest item in our collections and probably the brightest since it was dazzled last year.

Along with 700 tons of ship he also inherited a couple of old tea pots and had a tea pot polishing competition with George, one of the volunteers on the ship. The results were so good that they decided they needed two new tea cosies, so they asked if National Museums Liverpool’s knitting group, the Knitwits, could help.

One of our knitters, Gina Couch, jumped at the chance to help, as she had a family connection to the Edmund Gardner. Her late brother Gerard, who was known as Sam by most people, worked for the Pilotage Service from 1949 to 1988, so he had worked on the Edmund Garner when it was used as a pilot vessel between 1953 and 1981.  Read more…

Tide predicting machines restored and re-displayed

26 August 2015 by Felicity

Test programming of the Roberts-Légé tide predicting machine (left to right: Steve Newman, Metals Conservation at National Museums Liverpool; Sylvia Asquith & Valerie Doodson (daughter-in-law of Arthur Doodson), both part of the original team of programmers of the machines, and Ian Vassie and Prof. Phil Woodworth, tidal scientists formerly working for the National Oceanographic Centre.

Test programming of the Roberts-Légé tide predicting machine (left to right: Steve Newman, Metals Conservation at National Museums Liverpool; Sylvia Asquith & Valerie Doodson (daughter-in-law of Arthur Doodson), both part of the original team of programmers of the machines, and Ian Vassie and Prof. Phil Woodworth, tidal scientists formerly working for the National Oceanographic Centre.

Restoring two of the most significant tide predicting machines ever built to their former working glory was a challenge recently undertaken by members of our conservation team. In this post, Steve Newman, head of metals conservation at National Museums Liverpool, talks us though the importance of the machines, which are now on display at the National Oceanographic Centre (NOC) on Brownlow Street, part of the University of Liverpool campus. Read more…

Be dazzled in half term

27 May 2015 by Jen

Carved ship before painting

A work in progress…

Are you stuck for something to do with the kids this half term?  You could take a trip on the Mersey ferry Snowdrop on 27-31 May, which has been transformed with a fantastic dazzle inspired artwork designed by Sir Peter Blake.  Dazzle was a scheme created in the First World War which saw Allied ships painted in outlandish designs to make them more difficult to target by enemy U-boats. Read more…

Behind closed doors at the Lady Lever Art Gallery South End redevelopment

8 May 2015 by Ann


I’ve been talking about our exciting project to restore and redevelop the South End galleries at the Lady Lever for quite a few months now and have been itching to get on site to see how the work is progressing.  Read more…

Restoring the Falaba painting

30 April 2015 by Sam

David Crombie with a painting on an easel with with patches of paint loss

Working on removing excess fill from the losses to bring the levels in line with the rest of the paint surface – there were a lot of big losses!

This is the last of a series following the conservation of the painting ‘Falaba’ by Gerald M Burn, to prepare it for display in the Lusitania: life, loss, legacy exhibition. In previous posts I have described the structural treatment, cleaning and lining of the painting.

Once the painting was safely re-stretched onto the wooden stretcher, the two main things left to do were to fill in the paint losses and then inpaint (or retouch) the losses to match the surrounding original paint. Filling was carried out with fine chalk mixed with a water soluble synthetic resin, giving a paste that could be applied the areas of paint loss – this was done with a small palette knife which helped to imitate some of the texture of the original paint.

Once this had dried out, the excess filler could be removed with small cotton wool swabs wetted with water. After that, I could adjust and improve the fill texture as necessary. Then came the exciting stage Read more…

Cleaning and lining the Falaba painting

22 April 2015 by David Crombie

detail of a ship painting, showing a small dark dirty area of the sky

The Falaba painting during the final stages of cleaning in the sky with nearly all of the dirt layers removed

This is the third blog in a series following the conservation of the huge painting of the Falaba, which is now on display in the exhibition Lusitania: life, loss legacy. In the last post I described the structural treatment of the painting, in order to reattach the loose paint.

Once the structural treatment was complete, the painting was turned over and cleaning could begin once the facing tissue was removed. Cleaning proved quite difficult, as the thick grime layers had previously been covered by the wax facing. Read more…

Conserving Egyptian animal mummies

17 April 2015 by Tracey

several small animal-shaped mummies on a table

A recent arrival here in the organics conservation studio is this strange little collection of Egyptian animal mummies from World Museum.

Here we have pear-shaped folded-up birds, cats with painted faces, a fish, a very small dog, crocodiles and something very neat in the shape of a miniature human mummy. Read more…

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