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Posts tagged with 'Festival of Archaeology'

Astonishing Anglo-Saxon artefact!

22 June 2017 by Mark Adams

This rare and exciting fragment of Anglo-Saxon sculpture was found on an archaeological excavation at Mark Rake, Bromborough, Wirral in late 2016! The carved sandstone fragment is part of a slab carved between 900 and 1100 AD, and is decorated with incised lines marking out a border around what is probably a cross. The site where it was found lies in the middle of Bromborough village, just to the north of the parish church which is dedicated to St. Barnabas, and until recently the plot of land formed part of the Rectory gardens. The site came to the attention of Museum of Liverpool’s archaeologists when a planning application was made to build houses on the site after it was sold by the church.

Little is known of the origins of villages on the Wirral, but there are hints that many of them have been occupied since at least the Roman period and possibly longer; earlier excavations at Thorstone Drive, Irby and Hilary Breck, Wallasey, had found evidence for Prehistoric, Roman and early medieval buildings and other features and Mark Rake’s location, immediately next door to a church mentioned in the Domesday Survey, suggested that it had the potential for similar finds. Read more…

Mythbusting archaeology

13 July 2016 by Liz

Viking lady

Viking lady

As the Museum of Liverpool celebrates the Festival of Archaeology in July with a week of free archaeology events we’ll be exploring latest research and discoveries which bust some myths about the past! Read more…

Lunt Meadows – where history and archaeologists are made

12 August 2015 by Sam

fields of long grass

Lunt Meadows

In this guest blog post Sally Taylor describes her experience working with the Archaeology team from the Museum of Liverpool on a recent excavation:

“For a non-professional archaeologist it can be difficult to find excavations without paying vast sums of money to join training digs. As a mature student with three years studying archaeology under my belt, I was hungry for experience in the field.

Enter Lunt Meadows.   Read more…

We dig football!

13 July 2015 by Liz

old map showing houses and fields, with one property highlighted

Detail from James Newlands’ 1847 map of Liverpool showing the Queen’s Head. Courtesy of Digital Archives Association http://digitalarchives.co.uk/

This weekend, on Saturday 18 July, our archaeologists will be heading out looking for a pub – but this one won’t serve them a pint, it’s the site of an important historical event, and is under the ground!

The Museum of Liverpool archaeology team will be leading a community excavation in search of the Queen’s Head, Village Street, Everton in partnership with Friends of Everton Park . We’re looking to find the spot where the agreement was made to rename St Domingo’s Football Club – it became Everton FC in 1879, and from this time grew in size, and became a founder member of the Football League in 1888.

Local historian and former Liverpool Echo sports editor Ken Rogers, author of the best-selling ‘Lost Tribes of Everton’ books has undertaken considerable research about the building, and has discovered Read more…

Time capsule discovery – a glimpse of Liverpool life, 1856

29 June 2015 by Kay

Get a glimpse of Liverpool’s history with this time capsule, which was recently acquired by the museum and is on display until 27 July 2015 as part of the Festival of Archaeology.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

This intriguing time capsule was recently unearthed by builder John Connell during renovation work at the ‘Scandinavian Hotel’ on the corner of Nelson Street in the city centre. Developer, Downing converted the building into student accommodation, The Arch, after it lay derelict for many years.

The building was originally constructed as a workshop, warehouse and showroom for Abbott’s Cabinet Makers. The foundation stone, embedded with the time capsule, was laid on Tuesday 9 December, 1856 by the owner Samuel Abbott Esquire. Several members of the Abbott family, along with Henry Summers, Architect and Jones and Co., builders were also present.  Read more…



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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.