Our venues

Blog

Posts tagged with 'international slavery museum'

New exhibition celebrating Black British dancers

6 September 2013 by Lucy Johnson

A dancer from the Jiving Lindy Hoppers performing at the Merseyside Maritime Museum

This week we have been taking down Oil Boom, Delta burns: photographs by George Osodi at the International Slavery Museum. It’s always sad to see a display close, but also a chance to put up an exciting, new exhibition! Read more…

Slavery Remembrance Day – the journey continues

5 September 2013 by Richard

Flower arrangement saying 'We remember'

Another Slavery Remembrance Day has now passed but this does not mean that we consign its message, what it means to the people of Liverpool and beyond, to one side for another year. The core message, that of “We remember” from the descendants of enslaved Africans, members of the Diaspora and the wider public only has meaning when we work to make sure that the sacrifices, and achievements, of the ancestors are recognized to make the world a better place. Idealistic, maybe, but without a “dream” the legacies of four hundred years of enslavement, and resistance, would be forgotten. The world is not yet a place with full equality and freedom for all, free from discrimination or racism, but it’s a place where many people refuse to let the past sleep, to go unrecognized.  Read more…

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. building

2 September 2013 by Richard

 Martin Luther King building

Richard Benjamin on the steps of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. building

On the 28th August we opened the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. building, which is next to the International Slavery Museum.  It was opened to the public just for the day, for a series of events to commemorate and celebrate the 50th anniversary of Dr King’s now iconic speech. This has became known as the “I Have a Dream” speech – delivered on the steps of the iconic Lincoln memorial in Washington, D.C. on a scorching hot summer’s day in 1963 to a crowd of over 250,000.

Read more…

Louise Ellman MP: “Slavery Remembrance Day fuses past and present”

19 August 2013 by Dickie

 

floral tributes on the dockside. Bright yellow and red wreaths with the words WE REMEMBER

Floral tributes at Slavery Remembrance Day

Guest blog by Louise Ellman, MP for Liverpool Riverside, who looks ahead to Slavery Remembrance Day which she believes fuses the past and the present. Mrs Ellman has attended every single Slavery Remembrance Day since 1999.

“Commemorating Slavery Remembrance Day in Liverpool is very special.  It is a grim reminder of the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade and an important part of the vital task of educating present and future generations about the enormity of this assault on human dignity and freedom. The consequences of the devastation it wrought on long-established African communities are still felt today.  Read more…

Join online discussion about Slavery Remembrance Day

16 August 2013 by Dickie

A head of shoulders image of Richard Benjamin  smiling

Dr Richard Benjamin

With Slavery Remembrance Day fast approaching (Friday 23 August), you are invited to take part in a special on-line discussion. Join Dr Richard Benjamin this Monday (19 August) between 3-4pm (UK time) when he’ll be live on Twitter.

Dr Benjamin is Head of the International Slavery Museum and will be on hand to answer any queries about this important week. Read more…

Money (That’s What I Want)

25 July 2013 by Richard

Blog

Hello,

Well in the words of the great Barrett Strong Money (That’s What I Want)”*Recently there has been some debate around the Bank of England’s plans to replace Elizabeth Fry with Winston Churchill in 2016 as the face on our £5 notes.  However, it has also been announced that Jane Austen will be the new face of the £10 note in 2017, an attempt at counterbalancing the lack of women.  People are right to scrutinize the individuals who are being considered-and that have appeared on previous notes-which clearly shows a lack of diversity, not becoming of a modern society. Now it is positive that Austen will indeed be seen on future currency but there will still be a lack of Black and Asian and other ethnically diverse faces.   Tokenism some may shout, maybe, but visibility and presence are often the first steps in people understanding how British society has “no singular ‘island story.’” Read more…

Which Black Briton should appear on a British bank note?

22 July 2013 by Dickie

olaudah_equiano_engraving

In 2016 Winston Churchill is set to replace Elizabeth Fry as the face on our fivers. It’s also been reported that Jane Austen is “waiting in the wings” to make her bow on a note sometime in the future. Which Black Briton do you think should appear on our bank notes? Dr Richard Benjamin, Head of the International Slavery Museum has made his choice. Read more…

Talking the talk, walking the walk

14 June 2013 by Richard

cutting the ribbon at the start of the Walk for Freedom

2013 Walk for Freedom

Hello,

It has been a varied month since my last blog.  It was a pleasure welcoming Garvin Nicholas, the High Commissioner for Trinidad and Tobago at the end of May for a tour of the International Slavery Museum (ISM).  My colleague James Hernandez came along to meet the delegation, a nice dimension was that he has Trinidadian roots.  As part of the tour we went into the Anthony Walker Education Centre which among other things has a display of Caribbean flags, except, quelle surprise, Trinidad and Tobago.  The High Commissioner kindly offered to send the Museum a flag for our collection.  He was very impressed with the Museum, especially the inclusion on our Black Achievers Wall of a number of Trinidadians & Tobagonians such as Lord Learie Constantine, Dr Roi Kwabena and CLR James. Read more…

Remembering to forget

17 May 2013 by Richard

The image shows the railings and the remains of the Auscwitz ii concentration camp

Auschwitz II-Birkenau concentration camp near the Polish town of Oświęcim

On Wednesday I gave a talk for the West Derby Society at the very grand Lowlands built in 1846.  The taxi driver, on being told what I did for a living, said something along the lines of ‘great museum, but not everyone in Liverpool supported and profited from slavery.’  I explained that we don’t say that, we talk about Britain’s role in the transatlantic slave trade, and of course we focus on Liverpool, it is after all where we are located, Liverpool took the trade to a new level, there were over 5,000 slave voyages made from the port plus several other  facts. I also pointed out that new research is shedding light on the diverse range of people (plantation owners/profiteers not the enslaved) that were awarded compensation under the 1833 Abolition Act (there was a Slave Compensation Commission) which shows that it was not just MP’s or the well-known merchant families but regular business folk too who profited from the enslavement of Africans.  Read more…

The pride of Merseyside

16 May 2013 by Angela

Three people looking at a painting

We recently got some lovely feedback from a couple of our members. If you’ve ever wondered about joining the National Museums Liverpool membership scheme this is what it means to John and Cynthia from Southport:

“The last thing on our minds when my wife and I visited the then recently opened International Slavery Museum was to become members of National Museums Liverpool. Read more…