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Lusitania’s maiden voyage

10 September 2014 by Ellie

Cunard liner Lusitania in New York harbour

MCR/25/118 Lusitania’s first arrival in New York. Image probably out of copyright, copyright unknown. Please contact us if you have information.

In the lead up to Merseyside Maritime Museum marking the centenary of the sinking of Lusitania on 7 May 2015 with our upcoming exhibition ‘Lusitania: life loss, legacy’, it is worth flagging up some other significant dates in the history of this world famous passenger liner. Read more…

Research First World War family history

4 September 2014 by Lucy

Image of boy trying on helmet

Our City Soldiers gallery features a range of military headware to try on

Come along to the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday from 10:30am – 4:30pm for a free First World War Family History Event.

There’s loads going on, including a trench erected in the Museum’s atrium, and an Edwardian School Mistress will also be on hand to teach people about the causes of the First World War.

Our Family History Events can help you search for relatives who served in the war, and give insight into people’s experiences on the Front and at home. This year, the event is more poignant due to the Centenary of the First World War and our new exhibition ‘First World War: reflecting on Liverpool’s Home Front’, which is being displayed to mark 100 years since the outbreak of war.

At the Museum of Liverpool, we look after the collections of The King’s Regiment displayed in the ‘City Soldiers’ gallery, which features a research database for visitors to use to find out more about family members who served with the King’s. The Devereux Database currently contains the biographical details of more than 81,500 men who served in the King’s Regiment during the First World War, along with approximately 5,000 images. This year’s Family History Event will be particularly special because the compiler of this database will be attending from the U.S.A.

We are also working with local experts and societies to assist visitors’ research of soldiers from the area, including:

  • Liverpool Medical Institute
  • Liverpool Medical History Society
  • WO1 (RSM) Bob Dixon from 208 Field Hospital
  • Local King’s Regiment experts
  • The Western Front Association
  • Liverpool and South West Lancashire Family History Society
  • The Liverpool First World War Research Committee
  • The Liverpool Pals
  • The King’s Regiment Association
  • John Moores University

There will be a range of family friendly activities on offer throughout the day including handling sessions, poetry performances and arts and crafts for younger visitors. Visitors can also meet the Museum’s own King’s Regiment ‘Tommy Atkins’ and see what his life in a trench was like, or learn about the embroidered postcards he sent home.

 

‘Bubbles’ the yellow tang

2 September 2014 by Alyster

A yellow tang.

A yellow tang.

‘Bubbles’ – from the film ‘Finding Nemo’ – is a yellow tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) who is obsessed with the bubbles that come out of a treasure chest in his tank.   Read more…

Alessandro Raho, John Moores 2014 shortlisted artist – guest blog

28 August 2014 by Lisa

Alessandro Raho

Alessandro Raho

This week’s John Moores Painting Prize guest blog is from another of our shortlisted artists, Alessandro Raho.

Personal relationships are important in Alessandro’s work and his painting ‘Jessica’ is striking portrait of his stepsister of the same name.  Read more…

Meet our very clever octopus…

4 August 2014 by Alyster

Octopus in a tankOur octopus is pretty clever. Octopuses need to be because they don’t have a hard shell, they don’t have any sharp venomous spikes to protect themselves and they’re pretty soft creatures who are very tasty to other sealife! If they didn’t use their brains, they’d be eaten up in no time.

Of course, our octopus doesn’t need to worry about escaping from predators; we don’t keep any in the tank with him. He doesn’t need to be feeling his way around, trying to find a quick exit or avoid being eaten.  Read more…

Octo-mania!

11 July 2014 by Emma Duffy

Octopus in a tank

The ‘Common Octopus’ (Octopus Vulgaris)

We’ve got a brand new tentacled friend here at World Museum and recently I was lucky enough to meet him!

Although called the ‘Common Octopus’ (Octopus Vulgaris), we think he is far from that. The Common Octopus has the amazing ability to camouflage itself to hide from predators, changing colour and appearance rapidly to match its surroundings.  Read more…

Liver Bird in the making – the Bromsgrove connection

10 June 2014 by Kay

Liver Bird 1910 0012This fabulous photograph of one of the Liver Birds being constructed in the Bromsgrove Guild Workshops, 1910, was recently sent to us by Charles Bateman from Bromsgrove.

The Bromsgrove Guild were awarded this important new commission by The Royal Liver Assurance Company who wanted two mythical Liver Birds to be mounted on the twin towers of its new head office at the Pier Head when it opened 19 July, 1911.

The Illustrated History of The Bromsgrove Guild reveals that the Liver Birds presented various design problems during construction, both because of their large size and the height at which they were mounted – 300 feet from the ground. They also had to withstand extremely high winds without being too heavy. Read more…

Queen Victoria in Liverpool

30 May 2014 by Jen

Queen Victoria cruise liner moored in Liverpool

The magnificent Cunard liner MS Queen Victoria arrived this morning at the Liverpool landing stage to spend the night in the city, making her the first Cunard liner to do so since the Franconia in 1968. She is a spectacular sight down here at the waterfront and people have been flocking to see her, bowled over by her size and grandeur! Read more…

Jane’s jigsaw – ‘From There to Here’

28 May 2014 by Kay

jigsaw with photos of different people and objects

This jigsaw is one of 8 unique and wonderful artworks on display in the exhibition From There to Here: the hidden history of People with Learning Difficulties in Merseyside, Museum of Liverpool.

The artworks celebrate the lives and experiences of the people who helped to make the exhibition. Each participant met and briefed local artists who designed and made the pieces, using the participant’s oral testimonies and interviews as inspiration.

The special jigsaw represents things very close to participant Jane Fradley’s heart – Ant and Dec, Prince William… and her boyfriend Neil! It was made by local artist Annette Jamieson. Read more…

Gill – a very handsome fish

23 May 2014 by Alyster

A black, white and yellow fish

Moorish Idol fish. Image courtesy of Brocken Inaglory on Wikimedia.

The Moorish Idol (Zanclus cornutus) is a very handsome fish in my opinion. They elegantly glide through the water with their elongated dorsal fin trailing behind them. It’s believed this extended fin is to show off to potential partners about how attractive they are. If they have a short dorsal fin, which does happen as it lures some species of fish to nip at it, the fish will be seen as weaker than those with super long trailing fins, who were able to avoid being nibbled.  Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.