Blog

Brookie: A few LGBT ‘firsts’ and a kiss that went global

5 February 2016 by Matt

Phil Redmond sitting by a 'Brookside Close' street sign

© Liverpool Daily Post and Echo

Working on the Pride and Prejudice project means that I spend a lot of my time thinking about the story of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans people in Liverpool. February is LGBT History Month in the United Kingdom and this means a whole month where a lot of people are thinking about the history of LGBT people.

Sometimes LGBT history can crop up in rather unexpected places. Did you know that the Liverpool-based soap opera Brookside was responsible for a few LGBT ‘firsts’ not just in the UK but internationally?  Read more…

Explore our Roman past

3 February 2016 by Liz

Roman coins

Roman denarii coins from the Malpas Hoard

To coincide with our forthcoming exhibition, Roman Treasures of Cheshire, there’s a great opportunity to explore the Roman past of north west England in detail at a forthcoming day conference. The Cheshire Hoards and the Romano-British North West conference will run on Saturday 27 February at the Museum of Liverpool. Archaeologists from around the country will present the latest research about finds and explore the context of settlement in this region.

The Cheshire Hoards are two groups of Roman Treasure, the Malpas Hoard and the Knutsford Hoard.  These have both recently been reported through the Portable Antiquities Scheme and have now been acquired by Museum of Liverpool and Congleton Museum jointly through a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.  Read more…

Poppies – a botanist’s view

1 February 2016 by Geraldine

pressed yellow poppies mounted on paper

Welsh poppy, Meconopsis cambrica. This specimen was collected in May 1949 from Hawkshead, Cumbria. Accession number 1987.376.98

As a botanist I was fascinated to see the Poppies: Women and War exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool, which includes botanical photographs of poppies in the field and draws on themes of strength and resilience inspired by the flower.

Poppies always invoke for me a feeling of happiness, large colourful flowers in bright garish colours. ‘Poppy’ refers to a group of species that cover a number of genera in the family Papaveraceae. The one that springs to mind for most people is Papaver rhoeas which is used as the symbol of remembrance and hope.  Read more…

Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place

29 January 2016 by Sam Vaux

Tiled shop front with decorative hoarding

Galkoff’s butcher’s shop today – behind protective hoarding, courtesy of LSTM

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) and National Museums Liverpool (NML) are working together to preserve, record and display the heritage of two important sites on the LSTM campus.

Galkoff’s was a former Jewish butcher’s shop that emerged in the early 20th century. Since the 1970s the building has deteriorated and is unfortunately beyond repair. LSTM acquired the building in 2012, and working in partnership with NML intend to remove the famous tiled frontage from the building, re-present it within the Museum of Liverpool and tell the fascinating history of the business and its place within the local Jewish community.  Read more…

Found – that’s me in the photo!

27 January 2016 by Kay

Woman and boys with Jubilee decorations

Silver Jubilee street party, June 1977, Old Swan, Liverpool

Julie Howard recently recognised herself when she spotted our appeal to trace the people in this fantastic photograph in our exhibition, ‘Growing up in the city: in photographs’ at the Museum of Liverpool.

The photograph was taken during celebrations for the Queen’s Silver Jubilee, June 1977, in Old Swan, by local photographer Harold Douglas Avington.

Julie, 55, was thrilled and honoured to see the photograph, which brought back many happy memories. Julie, then aged 16, was snapped with her two young nephews at their street party in Ulster Road. Read more…

Eberle Street: cock fights, The Tempest and 250 years of transformation

25 January 2016 by Matt

Garlands New Year's Eve poster with people dressed as Wizard of Oz characters

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Eberle Street, it is one of the main streets in Liverpool’s defined ‘Gay Quarter’ around Victoria Street and Dale Street, and is home to Garlands nightclub and to GBar – but more on those a little later.

Eberle Street is soon to have a makeover with ‘a unique paving and lighting scheme paying homage to the mythical Emerald City, Yellow Brick Road and Judy Garland’. Now, makeovers often lead people who work in museums, especially to me working on the Pride and Prejudice project to start thinking about the past. How did Eberle Street go from being a dark and non-descript alley to being a thoroughfare straight out the Wizard of Oz? Read more…

And the winner is… Tramcar 245!

22 January 2016 by Sharon

people holding a 'Tram of the Year' sign by Tramcar 245

Keith Carmichael, Ron Martin and Rob Jones from MTPS and Sharon Brown from the Museum of Liverpool celebrate winning Tram of the Year

Hurrah! The Museum of Liverpool’s Tramcar 245 has been voted ‘Tram of the Year (Traditional)’ by the British Trams Online website.

We know its not the Oscars but this award, voted for by the public, is great recognition for the work done by the members of the Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society (MTPS) on our wonderful tram.

The project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, ran for six years and the majority of work was done by a group of dedicated volunteers from MTPS with support from the Museum of Liverpool and Wirral Borough Council.

Tramcar 245 received 41% of the vote, beating trams from Blackpool, Bury and London. Many thanks to everyone who took the time to vote, your support is much appreciated.

We are very proud of this achievement and encourage you to visit the Wirral Transport Museum to see our award winner and take a ride on the Birkenhead Heritage Tramway.

Please check the Merseyside Tramway Preservation Society website for opening hours and the timetable for the trams.

happy passengers on Tramcar 245

Many people have enjoyed a trip on Tramcar 245 since it was launched last year

Lily of the Scally – her life and legacy

5 January 2016 by Matt

magazine cover featuring Lily Savage

As a child I remember seeing Lily Savage on the television. Growing up in London it was perhaps the first Liverpool accent I heard – it is certainly one of the first I remember anyway.  Read more…

A year in blogs – our top 5 stories from 2015!

31 December 2015 by Lisa

Mother and sons with Jubilee decorations

Silver Jubilee street party, June 1977, Old Swan, Liverpool

As 2015 draws to a close, we’re looking back on some of the most popular stories from the blog this year. We began the year by revealing how the Walker Art Gallery’s Henry VIII portrait was used as inspiration for the costumes in BBC drama series, ‘Wolf Hall’ – and we ended the year with our celebrations at World Museum for the amazing blast off of Tim Peake!

But which are the stories that have captured your imagination this year? Here are are the top five stories from our blog that you’ve been enjoying the most in 2015… *drum roll please* Read more…

All that glitters – is it gold?

15 December 2015 by Liz

Roman coins

One of the Museum of Liverpool’s latest acquisitions into the Regional Archaeology Collection is the amazing Malpas Hoard. This collection of coins, buried around AD50 has been acquired jointly with Congleton Museum as part of the Cheshire Hoards Project, supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The hoard consists of seven Iron Age coins, of a denomination called staters, and 28 Roman coins of a denomination called denarii. Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.