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Hillsborough remembered

15 April 2014 by Lucy

Picture showing 15/4/1989

The date of the Hillsborough tragedy will remain on the Museum of Liverpool until 21 April

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy.

Across Liverpool, people will be paying their respects by taking part in a minute’s silence at 3:06pm, the time the match was abandoned on 15 April, 1989.

All National Museums Liverpool venues will be recognising the minute’s silence.

Our guest blog today comes from our colleagues at the National Football Museum, who will also be joining with us at 3:06pm to remember the 96 people who lost their lives that day:

 

The Hillsborough stadium disaster remains one of the defining images of football for anyone who was old enough to see the pictures from the ground in April 1989.

While the sympathies of the country went to the families affected in Liverpool, many people recognised that this could have happened in their ground, to their fans; their family.

As a Museum, we recognise that Hillsborough is a story that has to be told to anyone who wants to learn about the history of the game. In the National Football Museum, a lone red and white scarf, one of thousands tied to a railing outside Anfield in the days following the disaster, represents those who lost their lives, and those who remember them, in the museum’s ‘First XI’: 11 key moments in football history.

The tragic events of 15 April 1989 changed football forever in this country. The National Football Museum will join with football fans across the country and National Museums Liverpool in observing the 25th anniversary.

15.4.1989 – A tribute

11 April 2014 by Lucy

Display of date on the Museum of Liverpool

The Museum of Liverpool’s commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough tragedy

15 April 2014 will mark 25 years since 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Hillsborough during the FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest.

The Museum of Liverpool – dedicated to telling the story of Liverpool and its people – is commemorating this date for all to see, recognising its significance and the city’s united grief for those who were lost but will never be forgotten.  Read more…

Look out for the Vikings!

4 April 2014 by Liz

Huxley-Hoard-Treasure-for-wVikings are all the rage at the moment!  With the major ‘Vikings: life and legend exhibition‘ at the British Museum, ‘The Vikings’ dramatised TV series on Love Film or DVD and even a Telegraph newspaper test of your own Viking credentials!

If you want your dose of Vikings here in Liverpool, you should to come to the Museum of Liverpool and see the Huxley Hoard of Viking silver, on display in the Timeline on the first floor.  Read more…

Angela Rippon launches ‘When I was little’

31 March 2014 by Lucy

Photo of Angela Rippon holding When I was little backpack

Angela Rippon launches When I was little (c) Robin Clewley

Last week, we were very lucky to have Angela Rippon come to visit the Museum of Liverpool to launch a brand new project for children and their grandparents. Read more…

“Your Museum made me cry – not once, but twice”

26 March 2014 by Dickie

A photo of a twitter message saying how emotional a visitor became at the museum

Tweet from visitor Yaz about her trip to the Museum of Liverpool

Visitor Yasamin Saeidi was so moved by The Museum of Liverpool that she burst into tears. When she tweeted about her emotional visit we asked her to expand on her thoughts.

Yaz tweeted: “The wonderful Museum of Liverpool. First museum to ever make me cry. Twice.” Read more…

5 years on twitter – a look back

25 March 2014 by Sam

screen showing the message 'Am I on your tweetwall? How exciting is this?'

The tweetwall at the opening of the Museum of Liverpool

As it’s #MuseumWeek on twitter it felt like an appropriate time to reflect on our oldest and most popular twitter account.

The Museum of Liverpool’s twitter account was set up on 23 February 2009, just over 5 years ago. It was our first venue to start tweeting, in fact not many other museums were even on twitter at the time. As you can see from this photo taken the previous week, the museum looked very different back then as it was still under construction. Read more…

Microfade testing of light sensitive collections

19 March 2014 by Sam

Man with technical equipment and a decorative table

Visiting conservation scientist, Bruce Ford, testing the light fastness of a painted table from the Lady Lever Art Gallery

Siobhan Watts, Head of Conservation Science at the Conservation Centre, has news about some of the vital behind-the-scenes work that she does to protect our collections:

“What do a watercolour by Burne-Jones, regimental colours, Native American quillwork moccasins, and silk furniture covers have in common? Answer – they are all sensitive to light, and will fade to a greater or lesser degree when they are on display. Read more…

International Women’s Day – Margaret Beavan, Liverpool’s First Woman Lord Mayor

7 March 2014 by Kay

MMM-1998-115-(2)

8 March is International Women’s Day and to help celebrate, we are highlighting objects in the Museum of Liverpool’s collections which help to tell the story of some amazing Liverpool women.

The first is this painting of Margaret Beavan – Liverpool’s First Woman Lord Mayor and Children’s Champion. It was painted by John Archibald Alexander Berrie, and shows Margaret at a dinner at the Lyceum Club, Bold Street, 19 December 1927, held in her honour. A footman can be seen in the background and Liverpool worthies and their wives sit either side of her. Significantly, this was the first occasion on which ladies were entertained within the gentleman’s club. Read more…

Drawing conclusions about the past

6 March 2014 by Liz

Drawings of cups excavated in Rainford

Recently staff in the archaeology department at the Museum of Liverpool have been working on drawings of some of our finds from the Rainford’s Roots community archaeology project.

We draw a lot of our finds as this helps to record their form (shape), material and textures. Sometimes drawings can be better than photographs in showing some of the detail of an object.  Read more…

Processing clay tobacco pipes with the archaeology department!

27 February 2014 by Sam Rowe

Copyright National Museums Liverpool

Emily working on the pipe collection

Here is a post from one of our volunteers on the Rainford’s Roots community archaeology project.  Emily spent time with the archaeology team archiving over 8,000 clay pipes; here she explains the stages of recording: Read more…