Blog

The year of the dog

15 February 2018 by Scott Smith

February marks the start of the new lunar year, and it’s during this time that millions of people across the world will gather to celebrate Chinese New Year. Starting on 16 February, we’ll have seven days of joyous festivities filled with fireworks, lanterns and revelry as the city is lit up in red.

This year is the beginning of the Year of the Dog, defined by the Chinese zodiac cycle. Dogs are the eleventh sign in the zodiac and are seen as independent, sincere and decisive. Honest and loyal, dogs are the truest friends and most reliable partners. Those born in 1922, 1934, 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006 all fall under the year of the dog.

To celebrate man’s most faithful of friends, we’ve pulled together a list of dogs from across National Museums Liverpool’s collections and exhibitions.

‘Table d’Hote at a Dogs’ Home’ by John Charles Dollman

Read more…

10 Decades On: Liverpool Women 100

2 February 2018 by Kay

Gallery

Taking Liberties on display in The People’s Republic

2018 marks 100 years since the passing of the Representation of the People Act. After a long hard fight, some women over the age of 30 were given the right to vote for the first time. The Act also granted men over the age of 21 the vote. It would be another 10 years until this was equalised for women over the age of 21 in 1928.

The campaign in Liverpool saw both militant and peaceful tactics employed to win the basic right to vote. Women were jailed and force fed in Walton Gaol, bombs were planted around the city and windows smashed.  Read more…

Sapphic Suffragettes

31 January 2018 by Kay

Hilary McCollum

Courtesy of Hilary McCollum

Our final blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Hilary McCollum.

Hilary is a feminist activist, writer and campaigner from northwest Ireland. She will be presenting, ‘Sapphic Suffragettes: The key role of lesbians in the fight for Votes for Women’.  Read more…

William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’

29 January 2018 by Kay

Billie-Gina Thomason in front of a board with 'Prisoners' written at the top

Courtesy of Billie-Gina Thomason

Our seventh blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Billie-Gina Thomason.

Billie-Gina, who is a Phd student at Liverpool John Moores University, will be presenting, ‘William Seymour: The ‘Female Cabdriver’ from Liverpool’.

She tells us more –

“My talk explores the life of an individual named William Seymour, who lived most of his life as a man. William’s biological identity was revealed after he was arrested and subsequently he chose to be put on trial as ‘Mary Honeywell’, his married female name. Read more…

Chinese New Year at the Museum of Liverpool

26 January 2018 by Matt

On 10 February the Museum of Liverpool will begin its celebrations for Chinese New Year with a special day of free events organised with Liverpool’s Confucius Institute. There will be lion dancing, martial arts, Chinese traditional music and dancing.  The performances will be from 1pm to 3pm.  There will also be a Chinese Calligraphy workshop from 12noon to 4pm.  Please come and share the day with us.  Read more…

The Pansy Project – OUTing the past

24 January 2018 by Kay

two men at a flower bed, one in police uniform

Paul Harfleet planting pansies in St John’s Gardens, Liverpool with a representative of Merseyside Police © Paul Harfleet

Our sixth blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Paul Harfleet.

Paul is an artist who plants pansies at the sites of homophobia, including here in Liverpool, as part of The Pansy Project.

He tells us more –

“I began The Pansy Project 13 years ago in Manchester, since then I have travelled the world planting pansies at the sites of homophobia; from London, Liverpool, Paris, Istanbul and New York. Each pansy is documented in its location and then added to my website. This anecdotal geography of homophobia creates a fascinating narrative through the experience of homophobia. Read more…

Trans Atlantic Militaries : LGBTQ rights

22 January 2018 by Kay

Caroline Paige in Royal Air Force uniform at the door of number 10

Caroline outside of 10 Downing Street, 2012. Courtesy of Caroline Paige.

Our fifth blog post for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Caroline Paige.

Caroline, who was the first openly transgender officer in the British Armed Forces, will be exploring ‘Trans Atlantic militaries; how the UK showed the way and the USA lost it; and the implications for LGBTQ rights’. Read more…

Liverpool Pride – The inside story

17 January 2018 by Kay

Mayor leading crowds at the Liverpool Pride march

Liverpool Pride 2010 © Jeb Smith

Our fourth blog post instalment for OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February 2018, is from Joan Burnett.

Joan, a trustee of Liverpool Pride, will be presenting ‘Liverpool Pride: A Local Protest, An International Message’.

She tells us more –

“My talk shows the development of Liverpool Pride from a protest from grass roots reaction to a local hate crime, to a large scale public event that has become part of a city’s cultural calendar and which has consistently uses Liverpool’s status as an internationally renowned city to raise awareness of LGBT+ human rights.”

Read more…

The trial of Lord Alfred Douglas – have your say! Guilty or not guilty?

15 January 2018 by Kay

smartly dressed man sitting at a table piled with books

Lord Alfred Douglas

Our third blog post in the run up to our exciting OUTing the Past: The 4th National Festival of LGBT History conference, 3 February, is from Peter Scott-Presland and Andrew Lumsden.

Peter and Andrew will be delivering an interactive presentation in which the audience will be invited to participate and to come to its own ‘verdict’.

They tell us more –

“The trial is a reinterpretation of events believed to be well-known. Alfred Douglas is thought of as Oscar Wilde’s Great Love, and they are tragically yoked together forever in Queer Myth. Peter will argue that on the contrary, Douglas was nothing less than a murderer, both physically and creatively. Andrew appears for the defence, seeing Douglas as a forerunner of the Gay Liberation Front”.

The full programme for the day at the Museum of Liverpool can be seen here
Read more…

Get involved – Diversity Role Models LGBT+ session

12 January 2018 by Matt

At the Museum of Liverpool we are passionate about telling real people’s stories and using them to champion social justice.  As part of the event series for Tales from the city we are teaming up with Diversity Role Models to offer a great opportunity for young people aged 12-16 to learn about Liverpool’s LGBT+ communities, their stories and their histories. Diversity Role Model Kate Hutchinson tells us more about their work and what you can expect from this wonderful free session-

Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.