Blog

There’s no place like Garlands!

21 July 2016 by Matt

Seasons Greetings2This morning we opened a new display – There’s no place like Garlands! – celebrating the iconic Liverpool nightclub,  to coincide with Liverpool Pride, 30-31 July.

About a year ago, I’d just started working on the Pride and Prejudice project and within a week I found myself in the Garland’s drag room uncovering the story of a club I actually knew very little about. Amongst the sequins and feather boas I learned the importance and significance behind the music and sparkle. Read more…

Liverpool in Cinema

20 July 2016 by Laura

Cinema illustration

Liverpool in Cinema

The Liverpool Small Cinema is hosting a two day programme of screenings and discussions this weekend, which ask us to think about Liverpool old and new through film. Read more…

Room with a View

19 July 2016 by Laura

Large window

View from The People’s Republic in Museum of Liverpool. Image   © Ant Clausen

We’ve always thought the view from our window was pretty special but we’re thrilled to find out others agree. Read more…

LGBT History Month – get involved

14 July 2016 by Matt

Logo2We’ve some exciting news… Next year, for the first time ever, the Museum of Liverpool will be hosting the North West hub for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) History Month and we need you! Read more…

Mythbusting archaeology

13 July 2016 by Liz

Viking lady

Viking lady

As the Museum of Liverpool celebrates the Festival of Archaeology in July with a week of free archaeology events we’ll be exploring latest research and discoveries which bust some myths about the past! Read more…

The perks of being a Young Archaeologist

6 July 2016 by Liz

digging at Poulton

Today we have a guest blog by Young Archaeologists’ Club (YAC) leader Hayley Carlyle and YAC member Amy:

“The Mersey and Dee YAC is one of almost 70 UK branches, headed by the Council for British Archaeology, that endeavours to help young people between 8-16 learn about archaeology and make new friends. Read more…

Commemorating the first day of the Somme

monument with wreaths of poppies

A memorial to the Liverpool and Manchester Pals in Montauban village commemorates their actions on 1 July

In my previous blog I described how the first day of the Somme on 1 July 1916 was a disaster for the Allies, and I could write an entire article about contributing factors, such as the inadequate reconnaissance, the wrong types of ordnance, the tactical mistakes etc. Instead I want to talk about the contribution of the King’s Liverpool Regiment on the day.

The Liverpool Pals (17th, 18th, 19th and 20th Battalions of the King’s Regiment) had formed in the early months of the First World War. They arrived at the Western Front in November 1915, and although they had been involved in some small skirmishes, this was to be their baptism of fire. Read more…

The centenary of the Somme battles

30 June 2016 by Karen O'Rourke

old photo of a young man in uniform

Portrait photograph postcard of Private Harry Grace, King’s Regiment. Written on the reverse, ‘Signaller Harry Grace, Killed in France 1st July 1916, 18th Service K.L.R. “Pals” (2nd Batt).’ Private Harry Grace was a scoutmaster and prominent member of Richmond Baptist Youth Group. He was 19 when he was killed by a shell at the Somme.

One hundred years ago this week, on 1 July 1916, British Forces suffered their worst casualties ever in one single day. Communities all over Britain will come together on Friday 1 July to commemorate the anniversary of what is often called, ‘the bloodiest day in British military history’. At the Museum of Liverpool our latest exhibition First World War: Charity and Liverpool’s Home Front, looks at some of the organisations that were instrumental in helping both the casualties who came home from the war, and also the families of the men who did not.

That first day of the Somme saw 19,240 British men killed in action, a further 40,000 were wounded or taken prisoner. The British front line stretched from Gommecourt to Maricourt – around 18 miles of trenches. South of Maricourt, the French Army held the line. The battle was a tactical one, meant to divert German troops from a much larger battle, being fought against the French further east at Verdun.  Read more…

Social Media Day

30 June 2016 by Lisa Middleton

MOL twitter screenshotDid you know it’s Social Media Day today (Thursday 30 June)?

Social media is a great way for our museums and galleries to connect with visitors with fun facts, behind the scenes previews and exciting videos.

Read more…

Neither fame nor fortune – being a Liverpool film extra

29 June 2016 by Kay

Alison and Doris

Alison and her mum Doris in costume

Museum of Liverpool Curator, Sharon Brown tells us about her brushes with fame as a film extra in the city.

“My lovely Auntie Elsie worked at the Job Centre in Williamson Square and helped to recruit local people as film extras. This was how my best mate Alison and I appeared as extras in a number of films during the 1970s and 80s, including The Rutles.

‘The Rutles: All You Need is Cash’ was a parody of The Beatles, released in 1978. I remember filming at the Atlantic Tower hotel and the old Liverpool Airport, where we had to emulate screaming fans welcoming the band as they arrived.

Read more…



About our blog

Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.