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Trans-Verses: Poetry themes in The Glad Rag and Cross-Talk Magazines

22 January 2019 by Kay

Cross Talk magazine

Cross Talk magazine

In the lead up to our OUTing the Past Festival of LGBT History at the Museum of Liverpool, 23 February, we will be sharing blogs from our wonderful speakers.

First up is Valerie Stevenson, Head of Academic Services at Liverpool John Moores University. She tells us more about her talk, Trans-Verses: Poetry themes in The Glad Rag and Cross-Talk Magazines.

“At Liverpool John Moores University we recently acquired a small archive of books, magazines and personal papers from the family of Peter Farrer, who lived in Liverpool for many years and was an authority on the history of cross-dressing. His collection of dresses was shown in the exhibition Transformation: One man’s cross-dressing wardrobe at the Walker Art Gallery and Sudley House. The archive includes runs of two magazines: The Glad Rag, published by the UK Transvestite/Transsexual Support Group and Cross-Talk, by The Northern Concord. Both magazines contain a mix of factual advice and creative writing in the form of short stories and poems.

The Glad Rag magazine

The Glad Rag magazine

Looking through these magazines, it is clear how important they were as a means of communication in the decades before most people had access to email or the Internet. The poems stood out to me because of their intensity of feeling on themes such as identity and the pain of existence. In my paper, I will provide an introduction to the Peter Farrer Archive, which is available to anyone for research purposes, and identify the recurring themes in this group of poems. I found them extremely moving and worthy of further analysis to explore how they compare with more recent collections of trans poetry.”

If you would like to find out more you can hear Valerie speaking on the poetry themes in The Glad Rag and Cross-Talk Magazines at approx 11:30 am on 23 February at the Museum of Liverpool.

http://blog.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/2019/01/outing-the-past-festival-of-lgbt-history-2019/

OUTing the Past! Festival of LGBT History 2019

21 January 2019 by Kay

Rainbow coloured light bulb Come and join us this LGBT History Month at The Museum of Liverpool, 23 February, for our OUTing the Past Festival of LGBT History. This year we are one of 18 venues in the UK and Ireland, Norway, Sweden and New York! Speakers will be coming from around the UK , including some home-grown talent.

It will be a bumper day of diverse talks and a performance to end the day on a high (more details will be revealed). Why not combine it with a last chance to see our fabulous exhibition Tales from the city, which explores the lives and experiences of Liverpool’s LGBT+ community from 1967 to today? There are also a range of tours and drag tales to enjoy before the exhibition closes 31 March.The festival and exhibition are free and everyone is welcome.

Museum of Liverpool interior. (C) Pete Carr

Museum of Liverpool interior. (C) Pete Carr

OUTing the Past Festival of LGBT History –

11am Christian Owens – From Small Town Boy to ‘Visible’ City Cop

11.30 Val Stevenson – Trans-Verses: Poetry themes in The Glad Rag and Cross-Talk Magazines 1970s – 1990s

12 noon Pierrette Squires – Bisexual representation in museum collections – how you can help your history to be represented.

12.30pm Adam Hodgson – UNISON: Our Proud History – from lone voices to collective action for LGBT equality

1pm Chris D’Bray – Queering a Post-Modern Music Hall.

2pm Hilary McCollum – Public and private lesbian worlds in the 1920s

2. 30pm Steve Boyce – Sex, Crime and Punishment throughout history.

3pm Addea, G – Scrumming Together & Tackling Homophobia

3.30pm Natasha Walker – Better Connected – The History of Switchboard

Location – Education room 3, Floor 1.

 

Liverpool is Burning! House of Suarez

18 January 2019 by Kay

Vogue Ball 2017. Image  courtesy of Fotocad

Vogue Ball 2017. Image courtesy of Fotocad

“It’s always been my dream to create a Vogue Ball since I was first introduced to the vogue dance style in the ‘80s. To see the growth and passion of the Ball reach so many people is truly amazing and beyond my expectations!”
Darren Suarez, 2019

Read more…

Volunteer helps uncover the secret life of Pembroke Place

10 January 2019 by Rachel O'Malley

Liz Stewart and Susan Bennett

Liz Stewart and Susan Bennett

Volunteers are an integral part of National Museums Liverpool, and without them, important work would not be able to take place.

This month, I had the pleasure of meeting Susan Bennett who has been volunteering at the Museum of Liverpool with Liz Stewart since 2016; they have both recently worked on the Galkoff’s and the Secret Life of Pembroke Place project, which has driven Susan to further her research… but more on that later. I could have talked with Susan and Liz all day, Susan’s stories are fascinating and she has had quite a life! Read more…

Digging Up ‘Little Hell’!

20 December 2018 by Liz

Looking back on 2018, this has been a fascinating and fun year at the Museum of Liverpool. One of my professional highlights of the year has been the excavation we undertook in July at Oakes Street (between London Road and Pembroke Place). As part of the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project the Museum of Liverpool archaeology team worked with Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine to see what was hidden under their car park.  With the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) we’d been able to undertake extensive map and desk-based research, which had told us that this was the site of some courtyard housing, but you never know what you’ll actually find when you start digging! Read more…

University Women banner – revealing histories and mysteries

19 December 2018 by Kay

Women carrying banners

Women’s suffrage procession outside of Liverpool Central Library in 1910. Photograph courtesy of Lancashire Archives DDX 1137/5/24

The British Federation of University Women, (today known as the British Federation of Women Graduates), was founded in 1907 to bring University women together. The following year, a Liverpool Association was formed by Eleanor Rathbone and other local ladies.

Members worked for women in the city.  Mrs Nan Mackean, former Honorary Secretary of the Association explained –

“They raised money for beds in the new Women’s Hospital, campaigned for women to serve in the Police Force, and battled bravely against the introduction of the marriage bar for university women staff, which meant that if women married, they were automatically dismissed from their posts and were unable to continue with their careers. During the 1930s, and in wartime, members welcomed European women who were refugees fleeing from the Nazis, giving them hospitality while they waited for a passage to the USA, and providing them with clothes and money for the journey”.

Read more…

A Social Evil, victims or scapegoats?

13 December 2018 by Liz

This research was spurred by looking into Pembroke Place’s past for the Galkoff’s & Secret Life of Pembroke Place exhibition

Today we have a guest blog from Susan Bennett, who has been researching Victorian brothels to explore the ‘little hell’ underworld in the late C19th as part of the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project. This is a difficult subject, and original Victorian documents and records can be very blunt!

“Between 1837 and 1901 Liverpool expanded massively to become one of the greatest ports in the world. Every day thousands of sailors, just paid off, eager for physical outlets after hard months at sea, poured onto the streets looking for women, drink and other vicious practices such as fist fighting and gambling – the Social Evil! An east wind could carry off between 10 – 15,000 sailors a day on ships from the port and a westerly wind cast that same number ashore with full pockets and much energy, “to do what men do naturally”, as a newspaper report gamely put it. The police force, newly recreated in 1836 with 390 men rising to a peak of 1,002 in 1859, struggled desperately to keep on top of the ensuing vice, violence, and crime. Read more…

At the Cutting Edge, with Edge Conservation

8 December 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Anna Dembicka, who has worked on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project as an ICON Ceramics Intern. Anna’s detailed work on the tiles with the Edge Conservation team has brought them back to beautiful condition for display in the People’s Republic gallery at the Museum of Liverpool.

Galkoff shop before tile removal

‘There are few people in Liverpool who don’t immediately recognize the green façade of the tiled Galkoff Kosher butcher’s shop. Having travelled past it on my way to university every day, I often thought about what its history and its future fate might be. But it never crossed my mind then that a few years later I would have the privilege of helping to restore it to its former glory Read more…

Pleasure Gardens Past

5 December 2018 by Liz

Today we have a guest blog from Rebecca Metcalfe, a volunteer working on the Galkoff’s and Secret Life of Pembroke Place project, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Rebecca has been researching historical open spaces in Liverpool, and discovered a lot about Ranelagh Gardens Read more…

Graffitiology

3 December 2018 by Vanessa

Museum of Liverpool archaeologists and Lister Steps volunteers taking part in graffiti recording.

Recently the archaeology team have been working in partnership with Lister Steps; a community based childcare charity based in Tuebrook. We are exploring the history of The Old Library on Lister Drive, which is currently being renovated into a community hub by Lister Steps with support from Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

Volunteers and archaeology staff have been using the modern graffiti at the rear of the building to learn archaeological skills and building recording techniques. By setting up a string and using measuring tapes our volunteers were able to accurately plot the graffiti using the same techniques which are used to draw an archaeological section.  Read more…



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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.