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Posts tagged with 'museum of liverpool'

Christmas e-cards

18 December 2013 by Sam

illustration of monkeys and dogs at a party

As I’m sure you’re aware if you’ve been counting down the days on our lovely advent calendar, time is passing and Christmas is only a week away. It’s always the same, each year I say that next year I’m going to be organised, start my Christmas shopping in June and then enjoy a nice relaxed December. Hmm… Maybe 2014 could be the year that actually happens.

Today is the last day to send your cards by second class post in the UK, if you splash out on first class stamps then you’ve got until Friday. If these deadlines seem like impossible dreams to you the don’t worry, there is an alternative. Read more…

Santa Claus is coming…to the Museum of Liverpool!

17 December 2013 by Lucy

Men fixing Santa Claus

The team put the finishing touches to Santa Claus in The People’s Republic gallery

Yesterday, the Museum of Liverpool welcomed a very special visitor, who will be staying with us all through Christmas.

If you remember Blacklers Department Store on the corner of Elliot Street and Great Charlotte Street, then you may remember the gigantic Santa Claus, which adorned the façade of the building for a number of years.   Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Craig’s story

17 December 2013 by Kay

Craig Lundberg

Craig Lundberg

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our fourth and final instalment is Craig’s Lundberg’s story.

In 2007, Craig, a Lance Corporal with the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, led his men during a rooftop battle with insurgents in Basra. The 21 year-old was blinded by an exploding rocket-propelled grenade. After many months in hospital he recovered from his injuries but did not regain his sight. Read more…

Model locomotive joins the real Lion on display

12 December 2013 by Sam

man next to train model in museum display

David Cook with his father Bert’s model of Lion locomotive

Sharon Brown, Curator of Land Transport and Industry at the Museum of Liverpool, has news of a new addition to the displays:

Lion locomotive is one of our most important objects, and certainly one of the most popular in our collections. Built in 1838 to run on the recently opened Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Lion was taken out of service in 1857 but has a fascinating history and is an important survivor from the early railway age. Read more…

Our ‘Year of Action on Dementia’

11 December 2013 by Dawn

A man laughing as a smiling lady in uniform touches his arm.

Image courtesy of Pete Carr

Liverpool’s Year of Action on Dementia 2013 (YAD) has certainly been action-packed with lots of progress in terms of raising awareness of the condition, but there is still more to be done. Many organisations, including National Museums Liverpool, have committed to the Dementia Action Alliance and will continue to work together in 2014 to drive the changes that are needed. So, with the G8 summit on dementia currently taking place in London, what has National Museums Liverpool achieved through the House of Memories dementia awareness programme this year? Read more…

When Fern met Ken

11 December 2013 by Lucy

Fern Britton

Fern Britton films in the Museum of Liverpool

We were very lucky to have a special visitor to the Museum of Liverpool a few weeks ago, when the lovely Fern Britton came to film in our Ken Dodd exhibition as part of her series ‘Fern Britton Meets…’.

This Sunday, 15 December at 10am on BBC1, you can watch Fern meeting the man himself, discussing his life and incredible career spanning six decades. Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Jack Brunel Cohen’s story

10 December 2013 by Kay

Jack Cohen

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Our third instalment is Jack’s story.

Jack Brunel Cohen was born in 1886. He was the Jewish great-nephew of Liverpool department store owner David Lewis. Jack and two of his brothers fought with the 5th Battalion, King’s Regiment during the First World War. He was wounded in action at Ypres and had both of his legs amputated. Read more…

Calderstones and HER Research

6 December 2013 by Sam

ancient carvings on a large stone

Calderstones. Photograph by George Nash and Adam Stanford © Aerial-Cam

Over the last two months, three students from the University of Liverpool have been working with the Archaeology department on placements. They have worked on a range of tasks around archaeological collections, research, education and exhibitions. One student, Alys Randall-Smith, has blogged about the work she has undertaken using the Merseyside Historic Environment Record for her research. Read more…

By jove! Our members were tickled by tales of Ken Dodd!

4 December 2013 by Sam

Ken Dodd tickling Stephen with a tickling stick

Ken Dodd with photographer Stephen Shakeshaft at the exhibition opening in November

Fundraising and membership officer Sarah Houghton has news of a special event that was held for our members yesterday:

“Members enjoyed a really tattyfilarious event last night at the Museum of Liverpool. It was an evening which tantalised members with a fascinating insight into ‘The King of Knotty Ash’- Ken Dodd, to accompany the great new exhibition By Jove! It’s Ken Dodd! Photographs by Stephen Shakeshaft.

Read more…

UK Disability History Month – Caroline’s story

2 December 2013 by Kay

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

Caroline (on the right) with her friend, Heather.

We are highlighting people’s stories and objects featured in the Museum of Liverpool to celebrate UK Disability History Month. Caroline’s story is our second instalment.

Caroline France (or Carol, as she liked to be known), was born in 1905 in Edge Hill; the eldest of 13 children. From the age of 13 she attended the School for the Blind Children’s Branch in Wavertree.

Aged 16, she went to the Hardman Street School, where she taught machine knitting, basket making and chair caning until 1957.

Carol dressed stylishly, enjoyed holidays and outings with her many friends, sang with church choirs and choral societies, and most of all loved her dogs. Read more…