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Posts tagged with 'Oceanic 2'

Making three new guns for Oceanic 2

14 April 2014 by Sam

detail of guns on the deck of a ship model

Oceanic 2, showing an original gun (left) and a new one (right)

Here’s the latest update from ship and historic models conservator  David Parsons, in a blog series about conserving the model of Oceanic 2:

“The last of the major pieces of work that I have done for the conservation of the builder’s model of Oceanic 2 was the making of three replacement guns, similar to Bofors guns, or 12 pounder Quick Firing guns.

Originally the model had eight guns but three of these were missing. Read more…

Making cutters for the Oceanic 2 ship model

7 November 2013 by Sam

model rowing boats and oars

The conserved pieces of the tiny model cutters, with a scale in centimetres to give an idea of the size

Ship and historic models conservator David Parsons has been restoring the model of Oceanic 2, which we’re hoping to display at Merseyside Maritime Museum as part of plans to mark the First World War. Following on from his previous blog post, here is his latest update on progress:

“I’m still working on the final parts of Oceanic 2 and the parts I’ve just completed were probably the most enjoyable things I’ve done on the whole model, partly because of what they are and also because they are made up of so many different parts.  These were two ‘cutters’: rowing boats to be used by the ship’s crew. Read more…

Replacing model gratings – a delicate operation

17 September 2013 by Sam

detail of ship model deck with missing part

Detail of hatchway, showing the missing grating.

Ship and historic models conservator David Parsons has news of a very delicate piece  of conservation work that he has been working on:

“Oceanic 2 was built for the White Star Line by Harland & Wolff in 1899, it was commissioned as a merchant-cruiser in the First World War but sank soon after.

I’ve been working on the conservation of the builder’s model of Oceanic 2 for some time now and I’m getting towards finishing it. One of the early decisions I made was to leave the most complicated parts until last, and one of the most complicated things was replacing missing gratings.

Read more…

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