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Posts tagged with 'social history'

Our Day Out – get involved, memories matter

16 September 2015 by Kay

Boy at hoopla stall

Photo from Keith Medley Archive Liverpool John Moores University.

Ian Bradley, Media Lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University tells us about the Our Day Out project and partnership exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool.

“The Our Day Out project was inspired by a collection of photographs donated to Liverpool John Moores University by the family of Keith Medley a commercial and press photographer who worked in and around Merseyside for most of his career until his retirement in 1987. Many of the photographs feature New Brighton during its heyday as a popular seaside resort. Read more…

Colomendy Totem Pole

10 September 2015 by Kay

colomendy-totem-pole-topDid you go to Colomendy Centre for Outdoor Education in North Wales like generations of Liverpool children? If so you may remember this Totem Pole, which is now on display in the Museum of Liverpool.

It was made in 1967 at Sefton Park Secondary School by teacher Ken James and his students. Ken was a woodwork and technical drawing teacher at the school from 1963, until 1978.

The Totem Pole was made from a telegraph pole provided by Liverpool GPO. The carvings represent local animals, real and imaginary – including a Welsh dragon on top and a mother and baby bird. Moyra James, Ken’s daughter remembers that it was a close knit school with a great cast of characters, both pupils and staff.  Read more…

Bread – Home to Roost

24 August 2015 by Kay

Ceramic chicken

If you watched the TV programme, Bread in the 1980s and early 90s, this hen ceramic egg holder may seem familiar.

Whilst it isn’t the exact same hen which graced the Boswell family’s kitchen table, into which the family put their financial contributions in the opening credits of each episode, this special hen was presented to local actress Katy Carmichael after filming the final episode of Bread in November 1991. Katy, who starred as Connie – Billy Boswell’s girlfriend in Season 7 – was given the hen as a memento and thank you by the Liverpool-born writer of Bread, Carla Lane. Read more…

Liverpool’s Hispanic community – get involved

3 August 2015 by Kay

Chinese costume and fans in museum display

The de Larrinaga family display in the Global City gallery

Liverpool’s many global connections are celebrated across the Museum of Liverpool; including the city’s Hispanic communities. 19th century Liverpool was home to thriving Spanish, Basque, Galician, Filipino and Latin American communities who lived and worked in the maritime and trade networks connecting Liverpool with its sister ports in the Luso-Hispanic world.

In the Global City gallery you can see personal items relating to the de Larrinaga family – a successful Basque shipping family in Liverpool. From the 1860s the Larrinaga Steamship Company made regular journeys to the Philippines, stopping off in the great trading ports of Hong Kong and Singapore. The Larrinaga’s bought silks, lacquer boxes and Chinese-style furniture for their grand Liverpool homes. There is also a painting of one of the Larrinaga line ships – Anselma de Larrinaga on display.

In The People’s Republic gallery there is a ledger from a Basque Boarding House at 41 Hurst Street which records the names and destinations of dozens of Basque migrants who passed through Hurst Street on their way to the New World. Read more…

Scouse hair-rollers from the past

6 July 2015 by Liz

small ceramic bar

18th century wig curler found during excavations before the construction of the Crown Court in Liverpool

The HAIR exhibition in the Museum of Liverpool explores how Black hair styles have evolved and how they reflect wider social change and political movements. It considers the ways in which hairstyles have reflected status, identity and creativity from early African origins to the present. As an archaeologist this got me thinking about what we might be able to interpret about Black British people’s hairstyles from archaeological evidence.   Read more…

Time capsule discovery – a glimpse of Liverpool life, 1856

29 June 2015 by Kay

Get a glimpse of Liverpool’s history with this time capsule, which was recently acquired by the museum and is on display until 27 July 2015 as part of the Festival of Archaeology.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

Contents of the time capsule donated to the Museum of Liverpool.

This intriguing time capsule was recently unearthed by builder John Connell during renovation work at the ‘Scandinavian Hotel’ on the corner of Nelson Street in the city centre. Developer, Downing converted the building into student accommodation, The Arch, after it lay derelict for many years.

The building was originally constructed as a workshop, warehouse and showroom for Abbott’s Cabinet Makers. The foundation stone, embedded with the time capsule, was laid on Tuesday 9 December, 1856 by the owner Samuel Abbott Esquire. Several members of the Abbott family, along with Henry Summers, Architect and Jones and Co., builders were also present.  Read more…

Golden Wedding celebrations at the Museum of Liverpool

8 June 2015 by Kay

couple by museum display

Cliff and Norma Longfoot in front of Norma’s dress in the Museum of Liverpool

Norma and Cliff Longfoot, along with their son Phillip, paid an extra special visit to the Museum of Liverpool to help celebrate their 50th Wedding Anniversary – as Norma’s wedding dress on display in The People’s Republic gallery!

The couple were married 50 years ago on 5 June, 1965 at County Road Methodist Church, Walton.

They had met two years earlier at a dance in the Mersey Mission to Seamen. Read more…

Radical Liverpool in art

3 November 2014 by Kay

Painting of Rushton holding blinded people and a figure who has broken free from chains

Detail of the dome mural by Mick Jones, showing Edward Rushton

I recently visited the Liverpool Biennial group show at the Liverpool School for the Blind building, Hardman Street, just before it closed. It was a rare chance to see inside the building (normally closed to the public), particularly the large mural, painted by Mick Jones in the early 1980s when the building was the Merseyside Trade Union Community and Unemployed Resource Centre.

I was especially interested in the mural as we have a large painting ‘Unemployment on Merseyside – Campaigning for the Right to Work’, also by Mick, on display in The People’s Republic gallery which was commissioned by the Museum of Liverpool Life in 1993. Read more…

Research First World War family history

4 September 2014 by Lucy

Image of boy trying on helmet

Our City Soldiers gallery features a range of military headware to try on

Come along to the Museum of Liverpool on Saturday from 10:30am – 4:30pm for a free First World War Family History Event.

There’s loads going on, including a trench erected in the Museum’s atrium, and an Edwardian School Mistress will also be on hand to teach people about the causes of the First World War.  Read more…

Liver Bird in the making – the Bromsgrove connection

10 June 2014 by Kay

Liver Bird 1910 0012This fabulous photograph of one of the Liver Birds being constructed in the Bromsgrove Guild Workshops, 1910, was recently sent to us by Charles Bateman from Bromsgrove.

The Bromsgrove Guild were awarded this important new commission by The Royal Liver Assurance Company who wanted two mythical Liver Birds to be mounted on the twin towers of its new head office at the Pier Head when it opened 19 July, 1911.

The Illustrated History of The Bromsgrove Guild reveals that the Liver Birds presented various design problems during construction, both because of their large size and the height at which they were mounted – 300 feet from the ground. They also had to withstand extremely high winds without being too heavy. Read more…

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Welcome to the National Museums Liverpool blog! Written by our staff and volunteers, we’ll give you a peek behind the scenes of our museums and galleries.




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