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Mermaids, Monsters and Mantids, Oh My! Part Two Monsters

4 September 2015 by Paula

axolotl

“Smiley” faced Axolotl

Laura Carter tells us more about the baby boom at World Museum, this time it’s the “Monsters”:

Monsters
Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) are a Mexican amphibian, closely related to newts and salamanders with feathery external gills and smiley looking faces. Read more…

Mermaids, Monsters and Mantids, Oh My! Part One Mermaids

2 September 2015 by Paula

mermaids purses

A group of Mermaids Purse egg cases

Laura Carter, Education Demonstrator, tells us about some exciting things happening at World Museum:

“Here in the Aquarium and Bug House at World Museum Liverpool, our animals are having a bit of a baby boom at the moment! It’s always a happy time for keepers too, because if our animals are breeding, it’s a good sign that they’re healthy and happy. Not to mention that the babies are adorable! Read more…

Tobago: the final stop

27 August 2015 by Paula

The Tobago field collecting team: (left to right): David, Terri and Darren

The Tobago field collecting team: (left to right): David, Terri and Darren

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas, collection concludes her research journey through Trinidad & Tobago:

Day 9-10: Tobago

Tobago: the final stop in the herbarium/strontium collecting tour. Forestry officer Mr. Darren Henry picked me up early on the first day for a quick visit to the Forestry offices to discuss itinerary and best places to find the specific species we’re after, before venturing out to the ‘wilds’ of the island. Read more…

Tide predicting machines restored and re-displayed

26 August 2015 by Felicity

Test programming of the Roberts-Légé tide predicting machine (left to right: Steve Newman, Metals Conservation at National Museums Liverpool; Sylvia Asquith & Valerie Doodson (daughter-in-law of Arthur Doodson), both part of the original team of programmers of the machines, and Ian Vassie and Prof. Phil Woodworth, tidal scientists formerly working for the National Oceanographic Centre.

Test programming of the Roberts-Légé tide predicting machine (left to right: Steve Newman, Metals Conservation at National Museums Liverpool; Sylvia Asquith & Valerie Doodson (daughter-in-law of Arthur Doodson), both part of the original team of programmers of the machines, and Ian Vassie and Prof. Phil Woodworth, tidal scientists formerly working for the National Oceanographic Centre.

Restoring two of the most significant tide predicting machines ever built to their former working glory was a challenge recently undertaken by members of our conservation team. In this post, Steve Newman, head of metals conservation at National Museums Liverpool, talks us though the importance of the machines, which are now on display at the National Oceanographic Centre (NOC) on Brownlow Street, part of the University of Liverpool campus. Read more…

No rainbows but plenty of rain!

25 August 2015 by Paula

Clouds loomed and it started to rain

Clouds loomed and it started to rain

Tony Hunter, assistant Curator of Entomology updates us on the search for the Rainbow Leaf Beetle on Snowdon:

“We left Liverpool on a lovely sunny morning and despite the weather forecast we were hopeful of a fine day, but as we approached Snowdon along the A5 dark clouds loomed and it started to rain. Read more…

The central South West: ‘five-fingers’, ‘fat pork’ and tamarind sours

20 August 2015 by Paula

Waterloo temple

Waterloo temple

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas Collection, is on the last leg of her research trip to Trinidad before heading over to Tobago:

Day 7-8: The central South West: ‘five-fingers’, ‘fat pork’ and tamarind sours

Our last area was the central South West, one of the island’s more geologically complex regions, with both Tertiary and Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock.  This was among the oldest geology on the island, and generally, the older the geology, the higher the expected strontium isotope values.  We covered a large region over the course of two days, from Waterloo in the north to Moruga on the south coast, finishing off on the important archaeological site of Banwari Trace, home of ‘Banwari Woman’, thought to date to ca. 5000 BC, which would make her the oldest human skeleton known from the entire Caribbean. Read more…

Chasing Rainbows – Searching for the Rainbow Leaf Beetle on top of Snowdon

18 August 2015 by Paula

The Rainbow Leaf Beetle Chrysolina cerealis is one of Britain’s rarest insects

The Rainbow Leaf Beetle Chrysolina cerealis is one of Britain’s rarest insects. © Christoph Benisch – www.kerbtier.de

Tony Hunter, assistant Curator of Entomology tells us about a survey being carried out in conjunction with Natural Resources Wales:

“The Rainbow Leaf Beetle Chrysolina cerealis is one of our rarest insects and is protected in Britain by the Wildlife and Countryside Act. It is against the law to collect, disturb or even photograph it. Read more…

The source: Pitch Lake and environs

11 August 2015 by Paula

Pitch Lake and a view of the shoreline from the centre of the lake during a downpour

A view of the shoreline from the centre of Pitch Lake before and after a downpour. The two photos were taken within moments of each other.

We continue with Joanna on her journey through Trinidad as she reaches Pitch Lake:

Days 5 & 6: The source: Pitch Lake and environs

Pitch Lake: the reason I’m in Trinidad. Our mission over the next two days is to collect samples both within and around the lake to give us a good strontium signal for this unique region. Of course the other Trinidad/Tobago regions are important too – but this is the core of our study. Read more…

The oilfields of the South East and ‘pitch lake’ roads

7 August 2015 by Paula

The southeast crew

The southeast crew: (left to right): Keisha, Leo, Imran, Jameel.

Joanna Ostapkowicz, Curator of the Americas collection, continues her rather bumpy journey through Trinidad, we catch up with her for:

Day 4: The oilfields of the South East and ‘pitch lake’ roads

We were joined by forest officers Mr. Imran Mohammed and Mr. Leo Persad for our tour of the South East forest reserves.  This region holds some of the largest forested areas in Trinidad, including the Trinity Hills Wildlife Sanctuary. It also has oil reserves running throughout it, and there are many small oil pumps working away. Read more…

Mountains, Maracas beach and more mangos

4 August 2015 by Paula

A mountainous vantage point between Verdant Vale and Morne La Croix

A mountainous vantage point between Verdant Vale and Morne La Croix

It’s day 3 for Joanna Ostapkowicz on her research trip to Trinidad:

“Day 3: Mountains, Maracas beach and more mangos: the Central North West

The North West is Trinidad’s mountainous region, with steep roads heading out to the coasts. The roads cut through mountain rock, sometimes with only bamboo groves keeping the road from slipping down slope. It is here that we found some of the largest examples of our key species – such as this magnificent Andira sp. (Angelin), perched along the Marienne River. Read more…

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We try to ensure that the information provided on our blog is accurate and that appropriate permissions to use images have been sought. The opinions in each blog are very much those of the individuals writing.